Refinishing Kitchen Table

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  #1  
Old 04-28-09, 08:07 AM
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Refinishing Kitchen Table

Hi,

I did some searching and now have a general idea of what I need to do to refinish my kitchen table. I just wanted some more detailed information before I go and buy the supplies.

I understand that I'll need a chemical stripper to remove the varnish. Is there anything more specific I need to know about which type to use? I read somewhere that ill need a paint stripper and a liquid stripper, is this correct.

Does the stripper remove the varnish as well?

Also, I plan on sanding the table after I've removed the varnish. What grit and also what specific equipment should I rent? I don't want to do it by hand.

After sanding I plan on filling the dents with a food filler. Will any wood filler do the job?

Lastly, when picking a varnish, I understand that an oil based polyurethane is the best choice.

Thanks for the help, this site has been a tremendous help so far. I'm sure ill be asking many more questions as my budding passion for diy takes hold.

Thanks for the help,

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Old 04-28-09, 03:53 PM
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Looks like southern yellow pine. Lowes has an orange stripper, low odor/vapors and seems to work well. Can't recall the name, but looks like a thick orange drink. Sand with about 180-220 for final sanding. Oil poly is the toughest, IMHO. 1st coat should be thinned, light sanding after each coat(220), 3-5 coats. What you have now is likely lacquer, which is where the black water rings come from.
 
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Old 04-28-09, 07:28 PM
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Thanks for the response.

Would it be easier just to sand the varnish/stain off and then proceed from there?
 
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Old 04-29-09, 03:42 PM
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That will work. I suspect the black mark is not all the way into the wood, in which case stripping and a light sanding should work. But sanding everything off will also work.
 
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Old 04-29-09, 10:22 PM
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Peekay. I copied this off another site I answer for. It was a copy and paste. Dis regard the stain part if you are going all natural

No strippers!! Just sand down the table. You may end up retouching it with a stain because when you sand more in the dark black areas it will be a lot lighter then the aged areas not sanded as much. The "yellow" look isn't just the wood. Its also UV light yellowing that table.

I am old fashion I like to use a regular stain and not that combined stain/ sealer it gets sticky and I don't like to cut it down with spirits The best sealer like to use is a mimwax spar urethane. .To prep sand the table down real smooth and wipe down. To stain I like to use a rag or old sock to stain with and no brush (stain Only) so I can control the excess stain and not darken the wood to much. ( I like to see my wood grain) I hate brush on or sponge on staining.) After this let it dry and NOT out in the sun wood will warp badly. Now the stain will raise the grain. After completely dry use very fine grit sand paper and lightly "hand" sand down the raised grain enough to smooth it real good but not to much to get past the stain. wipe off good.

I go back over that with 00 steel wool. Wipe off and then use a tack rag from the paint supplier and tack the wood to get all of the wood fibers an micro dust off ( real important).

Apply your sealer ( spar urethane ) and coat the wood with a good brush and smooth out good but don't go to heavy. ( cut this down with spirits if it feels to thick and hard to brush out but not to much dulls the gloss finish) Let dry overnight Lightly sand this coat wipe down then use the sticky tack cloth to clean it.

The last coat, You might have to thin a little for the sealer to go on smooth and a full wet slick look, don't go to heavy. If this finial coat suits you good, if not do another finish coat after waiting 24 hrs. I'm old fashion. I like just a stain with no sealer in it. And for finish I like an exterior spar urethane finish semi gloss or high gloss. It is also good for salt areas and on boats.

NOTE": Pour some sealer in another small container as you go so you don't get contaminates the original can with particles be picked up from any dust the tacking missed. This way you still have a fresh dirt free can. Clean brush real good between sealing coats ( Dust again)

Also don't SHAKE the can. Its not a Margarita, any bubbles that gets in it from shaking the can will be your enemy, Stir only.

I'm an avid boater and I use this on the wood in and on my boat. Its even salt resistance.

Minwax® Helmsman Spar Urethane - Oil-Based Clear Protective Finishes - Minwax.com

So list is

Medium sandpaper
fine grit
very fine grit
00 steel wool
Tack rags ( they are in the sealer section )
Good oil brush
1 can Minwax
Mineral spirits
 

Last edited by 21boat; 04-29-09 at 10:40 PM.
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Old 04-30-09, 09:16 AM
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"After sanding I plan on filling the dents with a food filler. Will any wood filler do the job?"

Peekay, in my experience, wood filler on a stained (not painted) furniture almost always makes for disappointment. It will probably not hold up and will look different than the natural wood. If not too deep, the sanding referred to above might take the dents out. If not, after the finish is removed, try to raise the dents by applying a hot iron over a wet rag. This works quite well most of the time.

If all else fails, you could try a mixture of yellow glue, sanding dust from your table, and some of the stain that you'll be applying as a filler. Mix to a consistency of peanut butter.

You could also just accept some denting as added patina.
 
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Old 05-03-09, 09:56 AM
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Thanks guys for all the help. I ended up giving it 3 coats of varnish and it turned out great. The only thing I regret is using the wood filer and wished I rented an electric sander. The wood filer didn't blend so well with the wood and the manual sanding took forever.

Thanks again for the help
 
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