Respacing studs in a load-bearing wall

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-23-09, 12:51 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Ft. Lauderdale
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Respacing studs in a load-bearing wall

I'm in the process of buying my first home! It's been a bit of a nightmare, but I think (hope) it will go through. The little house is wonderful, but there's one thing that really bothers me. In the kitchen, the fridge is smack in the middle! There's no place for it that makes sense. If it were not there, the kitchen would be nice and adequately spacious, but I want to relocate the fridge.

Here's what I'd like to do, and need some help with! The wall that separates the kitchen from the living room I suspect must be a load-bearing wall. I've researched this for weeks, and it's the main wall in the house and I believe it runs perpendicular to the floor and ceiling joists. The roof is flat and there's no attic (only a small crawl space) and it's on a slab foundation.

Originally, I wanted to remove the whole wall and put in an island, but I don't think I could do that with such a large wall that is load-bearing.

So, I'd like to remove the plaster from the load-bearing wall and respace the studs to recess the fridge, build in a pantry and then also build in a dishwasher and microwave area. I would not be taking down the wall, but just respacing the studs slightly. I would give new header support between them to transfer the load. Then, behind everything, I'd build a new wall and build walls between each of the three areas, thereby giving the whole roof area much more support than it has now.

The question is, if I put in the new studs and then remove the old ones after, will that brace the load enough? The new studs will be perhaps 24 inches apart instead of 16 inches apart.

I appreciate any help with this!

Thanks,

Jen
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-23-09, 05:30 PM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,982
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The safest way is to build a temporary wall a few feet away. Why take any chances? You don't have to nail the top or bottom plates to the ceiling or floor. Just lock it in place.
 
  #3  
Old 05-23-09, 08:05 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Ft. Lauderdale
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks!

Actually, I want to build a permanent wall a few feet away to be the back of this new recessed area. So, that should be sufficient to carry the load while I respace the studs?
 
  #4  
Old 05-23-09, 08:42 PM
G
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: WA
Posts: 1,165
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
No. You need two temp. walls, one on each side. Then put in a header for the wall removed , which can be flush with the ceiling , if you hang the current ceiling joists.

Be safe, G
 
  #5  
Old 05-24-09, 04:16 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Ft. Lauderdale
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Actually...

I don't want to remove the wall. I just want to respace the studs.
 
  #6  
Old 05-24-09, 12:32 PM
G
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: WA
Posts: 1,165
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ahhhhh. Table 23 here:

Single Family Residential Construction Guide - Wall Framing

Depends on the loads above, with 2x4, roof and ceiling- 24"

Roof, ceiling and 1 floor - 16"

Does that answer the question better? Be safe, G
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: