Type of finish nailer for MDF crown?

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-23-09, 08:22 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Type of finish nailer for MDF crown?

I wasn't sure where to post this but I wanted to get some opinions on what type finish nailer I should use on MDF crown molding.

I have been looking for a combo kit but can't find anything that has a 16 gauge ANGLED finish nailer. Any recommendations?

If I had to choose, what should I get, a 15 gauge angled nailer or a 16 gauge straight nailer? I found a Porter Cable combo unit at Home Depot with a 16 gauge STRAIGHT nailer but I thought the angled ones would be better. It just seems hard to find 16 gauge angled finish nailers, except for the Paslode T250A which is a little too pricey for me.

From what I read the 16 gauge is better but can't seem to find any in combo kits or one that's not very expensive as I'm only starting out.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions....
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-24-09, 04:56 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,649
Received 319 Votes on 283 Posts
Welcome to the forums!

16 gauge is always straight and 15 gauge is angled. There isn't a big difference between the 2 although an angled nailer will get closer to the inside corners.
 
  #3  
Old 06-24-09, 07:17 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Washington State
Posts: 18
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I use a Senco FinishPro 25 for that type of work and it shoots an 18 gauge nail. Depending on the profile of the crown and exactly where on that piece you need to nail, a 16 gauge nail could blow your crown apart.

Good luck!
 
  #4  
Old 06-24-09, 09:00 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
So if a 16g finish nailer would possibly split the MDF crown, a 15g would be even more of a gamble then, right?

So I guess I should stick with a 16g straight finish nailer for this crown?
 
  #5  
Old 06-24-09, 01:33 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,649
Received 319 Votes on 283 Posts
I have a 16 gauge nail gun that shoots up to a 2.5" nail - but I'm a painter. The pro carpenters I know use either 16 gauge or 15 gauge. I don't recall them ever splitting MDF [I go behind them with caulk and putty] I think the longest nail a pin nailer [18 gauge] will shoot is 2" - I'd be concerned that a 2" nail wouldn't be long enough to do a good job.
 
  #6  
Old 06-24-09, 01:43 PM
W
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,709
Received 19 Votes on 18 Posts
Nailer

Be sure to use a nailer with a depth adjustment feature. I would use a 16 gauge to get the additional 1/2 in. nail length and try to hit the wall framing top plate.
 
  #7  
Old 06-24-09, 03:23 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,575
Received 94 Votes on 83 Posts
I bought a PC kit from HD and love the guns but sold the compressor to a neighbor - it was so loud I had to leave the garage when it ran.
 
  #8  
Old 06-24-09, 04:59 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
How about this DeWalt combo?

Yes, I've heard the same thing about the Porter Cable compressors, they're very loud. What do you think about this DeWalt combo kit?

http://www.dewalt.com/us/products/to...roductID=20658

It's listed on Amazon for $290 I think. It may seem a little underpowered but I'm only looking for something to start out with and do a little crown molding.
 
  #9  
Old 06-24-09, 05:13 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,004
Received 675 Votes on 624 Posts
As far as splitting the trim is concerned, its good to consider, but in this dicsussion it's probably a non issue because common sense (size of trim, holding power of nail and length of nail) usually dictates when to use an 18 ga gun and when to use a larger finish nailer. With small trim profiles, yes you always use the smallest gun possible. With brittle wood species, smallest gun possible. But you don't usually put up the larger crown mouldings with a brad nailer so that's why I would say it's a non-issue.

15 ga should have better holding power than 16 ga for those times when the wood wants to pull away from the wall. But the 15 ga leaves a larger hole to putty, so some think the 16 ga is a happy medium.

Personally I don't like 16 ga nailers because once you get used to a 15 ga angle nailer (as I am) the magazine on a 16 ga nailer feels big and bulky and it's in the way every time you turn the gun. It nicks the walls when you want to nail up and at an angle. Turn the straight 16 ga gun sideways... I know. It's just a pain. And as mentioned, it doesn't get into corners as well... unless you hold it straight up and down, I know. It's just a pain.

The one comment I would make about that Dewalt kit is that if you are going to get an 18 ga nailer, you should get one that shoots up to a 2" nail.
 
  #10  
Old 11-06-09, 02:16 PM
K
Member
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: So Cal
Posts: 155
Received 3 Votes on 3 Posts
Wrist problem

I understand it takes extra effort to twist the straight nailer to the side so as not to bump the wall and especially if you are used to an angled nailer, but what do you think of a straight 16 G for a homeower wanting to hang 5' to 9" crown and tall baseboards in their own house? I am slighly concerned as I have some wrist trouble when doing a lot of maual work (pick and shovel). I too almost bought the Porter Cable 3 nailer combo w/ compressor from HD.

Also, as for not being able to get as close in tight corners, I understand that many do not recommend nailing closer than a few inches from a corner.

So far, I have only done one small room and it was drill, nail, and hammer. Bummer!
 
  #11  
Old 11-19-09, 11:51 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: washington state
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I've done finish carpentry for a living for many many years and have never used a 16ga gun. I use 18ga or 15ga for just about everthing and a 23ga micro pinner for intricate details. the 16ga nails will leave just about the same size hole as 15ga when it comes to putty and as stated in earlier responses the guns are easier to handles and will get into tighter spots. My brand preference is Senco but that is different for everyone.

When installing crown you have to use the correct size nail to give you the right holding power for the size and material of crown. Most, if not all, crown is caulked to the wall after installed, this will hold it to the wall better than the nails in most cases. Even stain grade should be caulked with clear or a color matched caulk. I use 18ga nails on most crown 6" and under. Use 15ga on bigger stuff only if you can hit the studs. Remember that a 2" nail could hit wires and plumbing going through the top plate of the walls.

On tall baseboards always use 15ga and hit the studs.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: