shuttle bus shelter

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Old 07-08-09, 01:41 PM
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shuttle bus shelter

As a maintenance person at a tourist visitor facility (private property), I've been assigned the task of coming up with a plan and then to build a simple but attractive and practical shuttle bus shelter where people can sit inside and wait for the bus, capacity maybe 4-5 people at once. Sitting bench inside should be built-in somehow also.
We want to be able to pick it up with a forklift and move it for storage during the off-season, so perhaps it could be built upon pier blocks or maybe good sized treated lumber on the bottom, somehow up off the ground so can get forks under to move. Materials for construction will be wood/lumber. Somewhat of a carpenter but by no means a pro, I'd appreciate any suggestions/plans for building such a shelter. Thanks
 
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Old 07-08-09, 06:56 PM
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You know what I mean, a bus stop shelter where people can sit and wait for the bus. Here's a picture of a ticket/greeting booth on the same property, which was moved to this location with a forklift. http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/b...1/IMG_1131.jpg
When lifted, the pier blocks come with it, they are attached. This is the same type of idea, similar design, I would want for the bus stop shelter...
 

Last edited by sgull; 07-08-09 at 07:43 PM.
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Old 07-09-09, 08:02 PM
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Maybe instead of sitting on pier blocks it could sit on two 6x6 or 6x8 pressure-treated timbers, like skids. That might be better because it wouldn't be such a big step up/down to the ground. Any ideas to get me started on the right track?
 
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Old 07-10-09, 11:40 AM
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try a lean-to design

There are some very simple 4x8 lean-to type sheds that you could use as a starting point. Most are designed to be built up against the side of a building so you would need to reinforce the open side of the structure. You could use a 4x6 or 6x6 box frame for the base and just put some 2x4 under it when you need to get clearance for the fork lift.

Try this link for a basic design.

Home Tips : DIY How to Build a Lean-To Shed

Remember that when you leave the tall side open, you will want to treat it as a load bearing wall and put in a header support the roof. You will also want to brace it to prevent racking.
 
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Old 07-10-09, 07:13 PM
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Originally Posted by pjaffe View Post
Try this link for a basic design.
Home Tips : DIY How to Build a Lean-To Shed
The perfect suggestion, advice, and link to get me going! Thanks a bunch Pjaffe.
 
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Old 07-15-09, 04:14 PM
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It's been decided that the lean-to design (as described in the link) would be fine, except that instead the open end should be the high end. In that case, how (specifically as possible please) do I modify the lean-to plans especially in regard to installing a header properly across the front open end for stability. Any further comments appreciated.
 
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Old 07-16-09, 09:02 AM
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try this

Here is a set of plans that could help.

Black & Decker Power Tools

Some things to keep in mind:

1. Although building a floor for the shelter will raise it off the ground somewhat, it will also provide stability by tying the side of the structure together. You may want to add some extra framing below the floor to allow a forklift to slide underneath. I would caution against making cutouts in any plans you see online since that would be weakening the design in an unplanned way.

2. By making even a narrow wall on each side of the open side, you will be adding the support for the header and roof. Consider how the plans are created to allow for a doorway and just leave off the doors.

3. If you adjust the measurements, you can probably switch which side of the structure has the doorway or a solid wall. These drawings are from the Black and Decker site noted above.





If you need help modifiying these plans, you may want to consider having someone help with the design and construction.
 
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Old 07-16-09, 08:59 PM
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Thanks again pjaffe for that additional link and further suggestions/tips.

The shed as pictured in this link Home Tips : DIY How to Build a Lean-To Shed shows an "18-degree miter" there along the top of the high wall studs. Instead of doing that, would another acceptable method be to cut "birds mouths" into the 2x4 rafters which would attach to the top plate of the high back wall and the top plate on top of the header along the open front? Like shown in the lower drawing here, but also along the high wall opposite:
http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/b...er-opening.jpg

Also, if the bevel (or miter) of the top of the high wall studs is 18 degrees, does that translate to a 4/12 pitch birds mouth notch for the 2x4 rafters, if I were to do it that way instead?
Hopefully it is clear what I am asking.
 
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Old 07-17-09, 07:41 AM
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no notching 2x4 rafters

First off, I am no expert here. I am just giving you the same kind of info I would find if I were doing this myself. I always lean towards the conservative side of things when I don't have the experience myself.

With that said, I don't think you should notch the 2x4 rafters. They are too thin to be notched and still have the strength they need for the roof. The second diagram (the Black and Decker web site) has a more straight forward roof design. Fewer angles overall and you can use the birds mouth cuts instead of angles for the rafters and the studs in the tall wall.

As for the angle versus pitch question, a roof angle of 18 degrees is pretty close to a 4:12 pitch.

Good luck and post back when you are done so we can see how it worked out.
 
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Old 07-17-09, 05:35 PM
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Since patrons would be utilizing this, I would make sure everything is permitted and inspected by your local AHJ if required.
 
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Old 07-17-09, 09:43 PM
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Heck with the plans then, too complicated. Decided to "go green" with my own "open rustic design" shuttle bus shelter. Recycled some old building material and have progressed nicely to this point. Not quite officially ready for patrons yet. AHJ inspection pending.

 
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