stripping paint from woodwork/doors

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Old 02-16-00, 11:49 AM
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Looking for suggestions on easy ways to strip woodwork. I tried a liquid product that just turns the paint into glue and hard to remove. The woodwork only has two coats of paint.
 
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Old 02-16-00, 07:54 PM
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Susan:

As Euclid supposedly told an ancient ruler, "There is no royal road..."

There ain't no easy way to strip paint off wood.

You can, however, make it easier. Any wood work that can be removed should be. The doors should be taken down. Horizontal is the preferred position for stripping.

I suggest a semi-paste stripper as opposed to a liquid. My personal favorite is Strypeeze by Savogran. Costs about $16 a gallon. It's a little slower than some liquids, but has the plus of being easy to control when applying. As a semi-paste it also clings to vertical surfaces, letting you strip the woodwork you can't take down easily (door jambs, etc.)

Please follow the directions on the can. Put it on and wait the specified time (check your watch) before trying to scrape off the residue. If the initial application turns dull before the time is up, apply another coat of stripper right over the first one and start timing again. Here's why:

When stripper turns dull, it has used itself up. It may or may not have cut clear to the wood. Apply another coat.

You'll need to clean up with lacquer thinner and 0000 steel wool. This will remove the last traces of stripper from the grain of the wood and the cracks and crevices. The lacquer thinner will also neutralize any stripper you may miss during cleanup.

If you have any further questions about this phase of your project, drop me a line or stop by the Furniture Refinishing forum on this website.

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George T.


[This message has been edited by George (edited February 16, 2000).]

[This message has been edited by George (edited February 16, 2000).]
 
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Old 02-16-00, 08:20 PM
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George is leading you in the right direction with good advice. Note: a word of caution when you get the to the laquer thinner step. It is very flamable so have GOOD ventillation for the area and put out pilot lights, etc. while doing the work. Work safely and I hope your project goes well.
 
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Old 02-17-00, 01:17 PM
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Just one more thought. Regardless of the age of the house the doors should be easy to take down. Many houses built in the last 30 years or so, however, use what are called split jambs. The jamb, stop, and trim are all applied at the factory. It is very difficult to take the molding off these door frames without destroying it.

If the molding is held on by staples - don't try to remove it unless you are ready (and willing) to replace it.

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George T.
 
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