Cedar Woes

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Old 08-09-09, 11:26 AM
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Cedar Woes

Hi everyone, I am new here and this is my first post. If what I am asking has been answered before, please forgive me.

We just moved into our new/old house and have undertaken to remove a hideous plum colored paint from the cedar paneling that is in the dining and great room. The ceiling also has faux beams made of cedar planks (about 1/8th of an inch thick) surrounding on the three exposed sides an interior pine beam.

Well, we stripped and sanded it all in what was the most arduous job we have ever performed. I just spent a whole week up a ladder. Now the paneling looks great and is ready to stain, but on the ceiling beams, there are white spots where the cedar was sanded a bit deeper near joints or where the previous paint and stain penetrated deeper. I don't understand why the cedar planks should be so white inside. I am attaching a link to a picture of what it looks like when we attempt to stain it. It stays white and doesn't want to take the stain well at all. We have tried a wood conditioner, but it seems now we are stuck and cannot find an answer for this on good old Google. Aside from taking down the planks and turning them inside out, is there anyone who can suggest a solution for this problem?

Thanks,

Richard
 
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Old 08-09-09, 06:55 PM
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I wouldn't remove the planks. What stain are you using? I'm not a fan of minwax. Zars is a lot better or maybe you could find a paint the same color for those spots. You might even try a crayon, art pencil or something that a furniture repair shop would use, anything that would blend.
 
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Old 08-10-09, 05:07 AM
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Wood conditioner retards the woods ability to obsorb stain. You might try a combination of sanding [120 grit] while applying the stain. Sometimes the act of sanding will allow the substrate to obsorb more stain. Be sure to sand with the direction of the grain!
 
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Old 08-10-09, 05:17 AM
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The exterior (closer to the bark) of cedar trees has the reddish colored wood. The interior is white. This is just the way the tree is.

This is why cedar boards (and paneling) are fairly high priced. A good part of the wood is literally thrown away in the milling process, whether the end product is dress boards or paneling.
 
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Old 08-10-09, 05:43 AM
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George - did you look at the pic? The white is just off of a joint. At first I thought it would be caulking but it isn't the joint itself but a few inches from it.

Richard, I all but forgot welcome to the forums!
 
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Old 08-10-09, 07:57 AM
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Thank you for the help guys. I did in fact find an answer to my question last night.

I took down one of the planks and discovered that unlike the wall paneling which is solid cedar, the faux beams are made up of cedar plywood. What I have done in places, is to sand through the cedar to whatever is in the middle. The fact that the grain was at a right angle to the cedar's should have tipped me off quicker.

As we want to stain the "beams" (and wall) a fairly light teak color, we might be facing having to replace the plywood. After all the hours I have put into this project, the last thing I want to do now is to let it look anything less than perfect. Well, as close to perfect as I can get.
 
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Old 08-10-09, 03:14 PM
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I'm not sure if you can get cedar in 1/4" plywood but it would be easier/quicker to laminate over the beams that are all ready inplace. If you can't get cedar, it might be possible to stain other plywood to match [or almost] the paneling stain color.
 
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