Restoring to natural wood after painting


  #1  
Old 08-03-00, 06:14 PM
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I have been told that since my window frame has been painted white that I can NEVER go back to the bear wood finish look again. I was told it is because today's primers penetrate the wood pours so deeply that I will never get it completely out (therefore leaving a milky look if I try). Is this true?
 
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Old 08-05-00, 06:22 PM
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Nancy:

The frame and trim may be difficult to clean, but probably not impossible. That's the good news. The bad news is that if yours is a recently built home (within the last 20 years) and the trim was painted to start with, you're probably dealing with wood that was 'fingerjointed'.

Finger jointed wood is smaller sections of wood cut with a sawtooth pattern and glued together to make a longer, usable piece. This has been common practice for a good number of years where trim is going to be painted. It's just as strong for the purpose it serves, and costs less than trim made from one continuous piece of wood.

In other words, even if you can get it clean, it probably won't be worth the effort because of the glue joints and differences in grain from one piece to the next. They are next to impossible to hide.

GTU
 
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Old 08-07-00, 06:10 AM
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I have used a heat gun. and scraper. it worked very well on all my painted woodwork. including all the window trim. the house is 60 years old. nothing better than natural wood. it is tidious work though good luck
 
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Old 08-10-00, 06:44 PM
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A good chemical remover will do the job for you. I can suggest PEE:L AWAY 7 which will keep the natural color of the wood.
 
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Old 08-20-00, 12:38 PM
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quote:<HR>Originally posted by nancys:
I have been told that since my window frame has been painted white that I can NEVER go back to the bear wood finish look again. I was told it is because today's primers penetrate the wood pours so deeply that I will never get it completely out (therefore leaving a milky look if I try). Is this true?<HR>

I am with Rick. I have a 60 year old house that I have been Stripping all my moldings. I have also used a scraper and heat gun and stripper in some cases. I found a scraper at Lowes that works great. It has a carbide blade and gets down to the wood fast. Then it is just a matter of sanding. irregular surfaces I use the heat gun, stripper and sanding. It is a lot of hard work, but it is worth it.

 
 

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