Trimming a Door Width

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Old 10-15-09, 05:53 PM
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Trimming a Door Width

I need to trim a new door slab. I've replaced a slab for a slab before. However in this instance my new slab is 32 inches, and replacing one that is 31 7/8"
So what is the best way to trim an eighth inch off? I have a table saw, a circ saw with a guide, and a hand planer, amidst my possibilities.

Thanks in advance
 
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Old 10-15-09, 06:14 PM
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1/8" is exactly the width of carbide tipped saw blades, so in carpenter vernacular, "take a blade off". Do you have access to a belt sander? Taking that little amount off, I would opt for that instead of cutting it with a saw. That or a power planer.
 
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Old 10-16-09, 05:04 AM
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The table saw won't work unless you cad adjust your fence 32", if you try to take 1/8 off by putting the door against the fence your blade would hit the fence therefore you would need to move the fence over 31 7/8. I would use the hand plane but if your lock is already mortised you'll need to take the 1/8" off the hinge side. if you take it off the lock side the lock will stick out the 1/8 inch. Besides the lock side is beveled so you would also have to bevel it as well as trim it.
 
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Old 10-16-09, 02:09 PM
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Oh, I would never use a table saw, unless you had the set up like I have with a 48" table for runoff in all directions. If the door is punched, yes, you should take the stuff off the hinge side. Mortising hinges is not rocket science, but you don't want to mess with the setback of the lockset.
 
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Old 10-16-09, 02:19 PM
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The door is not punched--it's a plain hollow slab. Actually I have 2 doors--one is a 24", the other 30". I may try the table saw on the 24'' door. (Not sure the saw size will accomodate the 30''.)

If I goof--well they're only $20 each.
 
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Old 10-16-09, 02:57 PM
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The way I did it in the field was with an 8 foot straight edge guide and a circular saw. Be sure to clamp the guide firmly. If it moves your screwed. Use a brand new plywood blade. The need for a very sharp blade can't be over emphasized. The more force to move the saw through the materials the easier to go off track. You need to set this up with the two doors an inch or so apart. The second door supports the other side of the saw so you don't have to hold it level.
 
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Old 10-16-09, 03:14 PM
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Clamp a straight six foot 1x4 between the rip guide and the blade, set door against it to take an eighth off. If you go that way...
Be safe, Gary
 
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Old 10-16-09, 03:48 PM
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Gary, my picture of what you said is to attach the 1x4 to the saw??? I don't think I'd recommend that for balance purposes only. I use an extruded 6' piece of aluminum I picked up somewhere years ago, and clamp it to the work, moving the saw along it.
 
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Old 10-16-09, 03:57 PM
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I usually clamp whatever's handy [and straight] to anything that's too big to easily cut with the table saw fence.

Don't yell at me if I'm wrong, remember I'm just a painter, but to remove just 1/8" isn't a wood plane the best way to go?
 
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Old 10-16-09, 04:44 PM
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Oh, I agree, the hand or power planer coupled with the belt sander is the way to go with only 1/8".
 
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Old 10-16-09, 07:26 PM
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Sorry, the op said he would use his table saw, which I should have included in my answer... I agree with everyone to use a straight edge and circular saw if not experienced enough to use your stair gauge clamped to the front table on the circular saw.
Be safe, Gary
 
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Old 10-16-09, 08:46 PM
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Now my dad would have used his two foot long block plane, Sanding it with anything less then a belt sander with coarse grit would be slow going but also there would be a learning curve that might take more then an 1/8".
 
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Old 10-17-09, 04:48 AM
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Gary, gotcha, I just tried to picture it, and couldn't. But I see what you mean using a table saw.
Ray, Yeah, I got one of those old Bailey's and a slightly shorter wooden block. Don't use them, but probably should on occasion. True craftsmanship is an older art that needs resurrection.
 
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Old 10-17-09, 08:19 AM
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I have a power plane that I use almost exclusively for trimming doors. A couple of passes and you're done. Option 2 would be a straight edge and a circ saw.

I wouldn't even consider using a table saw. It's just too clumsey for a single person to handle. A sacrificial fence would solve the fence spacin problem though.
 
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