How to do chamfered edge with lark's tongue

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Old 11-05-09, 07:38 AM
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How to do chamfered edge with lark's tongue

I am newbie using routers. I want to use a 45 degree chamfer bit to create chamfered edges on a 6x6 post. I would like to achieve a lark's tongue finish.

File:Larks tongue.JPG - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

What is the trick? Do I need to lift the router when reaching the end of the chamfer to get the tongue? Do it by hand? I couldn't find any reference online. I will be using a handheld router.

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Old 11-05-09, 08:50 AM
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Router

You will need a guide to keep the router running in a straight line and a jig at each end to gradually run the bit out of the work. Experiment on scrap before "going live".
 
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Old 11-05-09, 09:49 AM
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The easiest thing to do is to get a chamfer bit that has a pilot bearing. Or use a router with a fence... might be an accessory that you can get for your router. The gradual end (larks tongue) is simply where the router stops. The larger the diameter of the bit, the longer the larks tongue, and vis versa. Just stop at the same point as you go around the post and you'll have it.
 
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Old 11-05-09, 03:42 PM
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A 45 degree router bit, whether self piloted or not, will not leave the lark's tongue looking like the picture because the top of the bit is a larger radius than the bottom, so there's more lead-out at the top than bottom. A cut like this would be easier on a shaper using a straight bit with a jig holding the wood at 45 degrees to the shaper bed. Set the fence to the depth of cut with the bit protruding in front of it. The jig needs to either move with the wood being cut, or be clamped to the shaper table and the wood fed along it. The bit should be as low as possible for safety. The larger diameter the shaper bit is, the longer the lead out or lark's tongue will be. Good luck
 
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Old 11-05-09, 04:26 PM
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thanks for the correction... I was apparently thinking it would be the same as a round over bit, but it's not.
 
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