Fascia Question

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Old 11-21-09, 08:21 AM
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Fascia Question

I am putting an addition on my home. The rafters end up being an even 6" deep at the fascia end.

If I tie them together with a 2x4 (my original plan), then face them with a 1x8, will I run into any problems?

Would it be better to use 2x6's?

All advice most appreciated.
 
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Old 11-21-09, 10:30 AM
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Fascia

If you use the 2x4 with the 1x8, the bottom 4 inches of the 1x8 will not be supported and will probably cup. Consider using a 2x8 and leave off the 1x8.
 
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Old 11-21-09, 11:41 AM
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Depending on what you will be using for a soffiting, you could install a 2x6 over the tails then cover that with a 1x8 for looks and to give a relief for your plywood soffit. If you are installing perf soffiting and covering the fascia, then leave off the 1x8 and install a 2x8 like Ken said. You really need the strength back there in order to possibly install gutters. No one has EVER hit a rafter tail with their gutter hangers in the history of man and a 1x piece of lumber won't hold.
 
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Old 11-22-09, 06:51 AM
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The double board system is normally used for wood soffit and fascia that's left exposed. It gives you something to fasten the plywood soffit to.

I would recommend matching what is on the rest of the house. If you want to use narrower fascia, just cut the rafters tail on a 90 degree angle the depth of the fascia you wish to install.
 
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Old 11-30-09, 05:02 PM
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I wouldn't put a 1x8 facia on a 2x4 nailer board.
Will definately cup
Install a 2x6.....might have to cut the tails of the rafters a bit to make it flush with the bottom of the nailer board....all depends on your pitch
That's where your metal J-trim will be installed to accept the soffit material.
Level over and snap a line on the wall to install another matching J trim.
Soffit should be slid in from an end of the trim if this is the method of application.
I eliminated my J trim at the facia by cutting a groove in the backside.
Cleaner look....asthetics and all....
The rafters and nailer boards in the pics are 2x6....with a fir 2x7 facia





 
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Old 11-30-09, 05:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Door Guy View Post
The double board system is normally used for wood soffit and fascia that's left exposed. It gives you something to fasten the plywood soffit to.

I would recommend matching what is on the rest of the house. If you want to use narrower fascia, just cut the rafters tail on a 90 degree angle the depth of the fascia you wish to install.
I can't agree with your reply......
Rafters or trusses are installed.....then a nailer board is always fixed to the tails.
It is then sheated....and everything aforementioned is nailed together.
Thus the roofing plywood has some solid backing between the tails.
Then the facia....(metal or wood).....when need be.
 
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Old 12-04-09, 04:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Sealik View Post
I can't agree with your reply......
Rafters or trusses are installed.....then a nailer board is always fixed to the tails.
It is then sheated....and everything aforementioned is nailed together.
Thus the roofing plywood has some solid backing between the tails.
Then the facia....(metal or wood).....when need be.
As noted... it appears you are leaving the fascia board exposed. You still have backing for the sheathing with a single fascia, just let the plywood overhang the rafter tails. Normally the soffit is nailed to the single fascia board and covered with the aluminum fascia, this also covers the cut edge of the soffit. No dado on the secondary board and much less time consuming, weather tight and maintainance free. I'll post a pic if you want.
 
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Old 12-04-09, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Door Guy View Post
As noted... it appears you are leaving the fascia board exposed. You still have backing for the sheathing with a single fascia, just let the plywood overhang the rafter tails. Normally the soffit is nailed to the single fascia board and covered with the aluminum fascia, this also covers the cut edge of the soffit. No dado on the secondary board and much less time consuming, weather tight and maintainance free. I'll post a pic if you want.
Correct, I am leaving the fascia exposed.... esthetics and all
Some people like the beauty of wood, regardless of applying a coat of 'varathane' every few+ years.
Anywho....
I never suggested Tom to dado the backside of his fascia, I stated....
"That's where your metal J-trim will be installed to accept the soffit material."
But.....yes.... the soffit material sits in the track at the wall and then nailed to the bottom of the nailer board.
The metal fascia is then installed covering the ends of the soffit material and 'nails'....which can be easily removed if damaged.
But, if he is installing a finished wood fascia(?)....he will need 2 j trims and a nailer board.....as I suggested.
No pics for me thanks.
Done it....did it ....many times.
I am a carpenter by trade.Beer 4U2Beer 4U2
FYI....those were pics of my own cabin.... I'm finishing with a little more detail.....much cleaner look.
P.S. I would still use a nailer board with a wood fascia.
If one ran the plywood past the tails to cover the 'single board method'.....the roofing material would now sit 1/2"+ above wf and expose the edge of the plywood(OSB)....which could been seen and look rather....
well....not good.
 

Last edited by Sealik; 12-04-09 at 12:02 PM.
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Old 12-04-09, 11:19 AM
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One could install a drip edge for a few extra bucks to cover the side of the exposed plywood.
But... with a single 'nailer' method/ finished wood fascia.....one still has to mount a J trim. Either installed on the backside of the fascia or the tails.
Either way is not very condusive.
If it's on the backside (which I've seen alot of).....not good.
Problem being....if there is any movement (cupping etc.) in the fascia....the soffit material usually pops out of the track and ends up on the ground.
Would also suck bigtime if the fascia ever had to be replaced.
Nailing the J trim to the tails of the rafters every 2 ft.....not much better. If the tails twists or moves (without the stability of a nailer board) the material will eventually...also... head 'south'
Fot this application, the bottom of the tails would have to be cut level.....or the soffit follows the angle of the roof/pitch.
 
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Old 12-04-09, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Sealik View Post
One could install a drip edge for a few extra bucks to cover the side of the exposed plywood.
But... with a single 'nailer' method/ finished wood fascia.....one still has to mount a J trim. Either installed on the backside of the fascia or the tails.
Either way is not very condusive.
If it's on the backside (which I've seen alot of).....not good.
Problem being....if there is any movement (cupping etc.) in the fascia....the soffit material usually pops out of the track and ends up on the ground.
Would also suck bigtime if the fascia ever had to be replaced.
Nailing the J trim to the tails of the rafters every 2 ft.....not much better. If the tails twists or moves (without the stability of a nailer board) the material will eventually...also... head 'south'
Fot this application, the bottom of the tails would have to be cut level.....or the soffit follows the angle of the roof/pitch.
I agree there is more than one way to "skin a cat" per say. My personal opinion is drip edge isn't an optional practice. All shingle manufactures instructions include installing drip edge; building code also refers to following manufacturers instructions. So therefore, it's a code requirement.

I've been building for 23 years and NEVER had a soffit pop out because the fascia twisted. If the fascia is covered it usually won't move or twist as it doesn't take on any moisture. We nail F channel to the wall and run the soffit level back to the wall. NO J channel is needed as the aluminum fascia covers and holds the outer edge.

Thanks for the exchange of ideas! Everyone benefits when they have options to decide from.:
 
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Old 12-04-09, 01:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Door Guy View Post
I agree there is more than one way to "skin a cat" per say. My personal opinion is drip edge isn't an optional practice. All shingle manufactures instructions include installing drip edge; building code also refers to following manufacturers instructions. So therefore, it's a code requirement.

I've been building for 23 years and NEVER had a soffit pop out because the fascia twisted. If the fascia is covered it usually won't move or twist as it doesn't take on any moisture. We nail F channel to the wall and run the soffit level back to the wall. NO J channel is needed as the aluminum fascia covers and holds the outer edge.

Thanks for the exchange of ideas! Everyone benefits when they have options to decide from.:
I was refering to drip edge installed to a metal roof....not shingles; since you stated I could run my plywood on top of my wood fascia.....for support between the trusses.
Which I would never do.
I was also referring to a j trim behind the wood fascia... when it was not covered with metal.
My point is.....I always install a nailer board......even when there is a finished wood fascia. As I have stated....I've seen lots of soffit falling out. This is mostly due to the j/f trim installed on the backside of the wood fascia....not the nailer boardBeer 4U2
 
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