Help Refinish Coffee Table (Veneer?)

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Old 12-15-09, 07:04 PM
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Help Refinish Coffee Table (Veneer?)

I have a coffee table from Rooms-To-Go that needs refinishing. It has this pattern on the top of the table that makes me think it may be veneer. I can't tell and i'm not too familiar with vaneer so I was hoping someone could help me. Also, how would I go about refinishing it? I would normally strip it and then sand it down but if it is veneer then should i just sand it down slowly? Only use a hand block or would by orbital sander be okay? Any advice would be great. Here are some pics of the table...

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo...eat=directlink

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo...eat=directlink
 
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Old 12-15-09, 08:13 PM
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A little hard to tell from the pictures, but appears to be solid wood around the edge with veneer in the middle. I think I would opt for a light sanding and a fresh coat of polyurethane. Are those water stains I can see?
 
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Old 12-16-09, 09:29 AM
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Actually the stain on the bottom of the picture is from a hot pizza box. Other than than there is a nice sized gouge on the bottom left and minor scratches all over the table.
 
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Old 12-16-09, 10:52 AM
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You have to be very careful with veneer as it may be too thin to sand without risk of damage.Chemicals also pose a risk as they may effect the glue holding the veneer.If you're lucky this is more an inlaid wood than veneer which may be thicker material.

Basically this is an experiment and you might want to be prepared for it to not work out.If it were me I'd try products generally referred to as "refinisher" which remove surface coatings like varnish or lacquer but are not designed to remove to bare wood like traditional strippers are.You'll be able to control the situation better as you usually don't leave them on the surface to set first.That said the risk will still be there concerning the glue.
 
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Old 12-16-09, 05:33 PM
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I wouldn't be too concerned about using stripper on this. It's definitely a veneered product. I do not have extensive experience with stripping but I have used zip strip on a couple old veneered pieces and didn't have trouble. I would recommend using something milder like citrus strip to err on the side of caution. IT will also be friendlier to work with.

After you strip, sand by hand to make sure you don't go through the veneer.
 
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