tube of caulking

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Old 01-16-10, 05:00 PM
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Unhappy tube of caulking

has anyone found a good way to save that 1/3 or 1/2 tube of caulking after using it. it always seems that the next time i want to use it, i recut the tip and can't get the silicone/caulking to play nice. i usually end up throwing the tube away :
 
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Old 01-16-10, 05:26 PM
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If it is a latex caulk, I find using an electrical B cap, or wire cap, usually red, as a cap it will twist on and keep it pliable. You won't have to recut the tip, just squeeze out the short plug of caulk that absorbed the air in the tube tip.
 
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Old 01-17-10, 04:04 AM
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A cap will work if you don't store the caulking for a long period. I usually stick a tight fitting nail down the tip. If it's latex caulk, use a galvanized nail to prevent the first bead of caulk from being rusty.
 
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Old 01-17-10, 08:05 AM
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Tape

I have found that the old do everything standby DUCT tape works pretty well to make a good seal.
 
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Old 01-17-10, 12:19 PM
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Air is the major culpert. I have used all of the above suggestions and found a combination to work best. Use a 16d nail into the opening to the head and then using masking about 2-3"long over the tip and pressing against the tube in the center. Then pinch the tape remaining on the sides together to seal it off.
 
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Old 01-17-10, 12:53 PM
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Well..I'll add some thoughts also..lol

If you use a nail, esp in a latex caulk..it better be heavy galvanized. A regular common can rust and leave streaks when you go to use it..then you waste a bunch of caulk.

I'll often run a long thin (1 1/2 - 2") stainless steel screw down in, then use the folded tape thing. One advantage is the screw makes it easy to pull out any hardened caulk and its easy to just clean out the threads and re-use it. I have a pretty large assortment of SS screws..so it works for me.

Smaller holes I'll use a galv finish nail.
 
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Old 01-17-10, 02:12 PM
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And when I can't get the saved tube to work I just slit it and use a putty knife.
 
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Old 01-17-10, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
And when I can't get the saved tube to work I just slit it and use a putty knife.
Been there and done that as they would say Ray. What a mess. I was laying plywood on a subfloor with the large tubes of adhesive. Apparently I bought a bunch of bad designed tubes. I had to split three and spread them over the subfloor with a 4" putty knife. Thank goodness I am over that portion of the build now.
 
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Old 01-17-10, 03:43 PM
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After sealing the tube, keeping it cool does wonders to slow the hardening, especially if you plan ahead or have a beer cooler near the site.

Dick
 
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Old 01-17-10, 03:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Concretemasonry View Post
After sealing the tube, keeping it cool does wonders to slow the hardening, especially if you plan ahead or have a beer cooler near the site.

Dick
Then I would never get anything done.
 
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Old 01-17-10, 08:33 PM
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Many of the soft caulks work well using the wire nut trick. Squeeze out a bit then screw on the wire nut. Some of the harder setting caulks work best by taking a bit of a plastic bag and wrapping it around the nozzle, folding it over then a wrap of electrical tape then squeeze out a little ball of caulk into the plastic wrap. The ball hardens and the caulk in the nozzle doesn't. Mind you they never last forever.
 
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