Problem with new Counter not "lining up"

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Old 01-27-10, 01:40 PM
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Problem with new Counter not "lining up"

I have a half height wall on one end of my kitchen, 40.5" high and 60" wide. It is wrapped in 1/2" drywall.
On the kitchen side I have base cabinets that take up 59.5" of the wall. The counter on top of those cabinets is 60" wide (flush with end of wall).

I had a breakfast counter put on the top of the wall facing the other side (opposite the cabinets). Unfortunately it was cut to 59" inches making it 1/2 inch short of lining up with the wall/counter top. It's funny to look at. Breakfast bar is made of barnboard.

My wife wants wainscoting underneath and on one end of the half wall. So I can peel off the 1/2" drywall on the end that's "short", and install wainscoting, but the counter will still look short.

And that does nothing to mask the fact that it's a half inch short compared to the counter below it. Especially when you are looking from the kitchen side.

Any ideas on how to hide this?
 
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Old 01-27-10, 02:09 PM
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Any way to post a couple of pictures of this on a site such as photobucket.com and copy/paste the IMG code to your reply post? It would be easier to see what is happening.
 
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Old 01-27-10, 04:18 PM
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So what you are saying is the lower countertop is 60" long and the upper counter that was cut short is, one inch shorter at 59? If it were only 1/2 inch off, a person could maybe shift the upper counter to be even with the lower counter, and fill in the wall end with something that looks like it was an intentional backsplash. But if it is 1 inch short - that is kinda pushing things. How much did this 59 inch counter cost you?.

Here is one idea that might be interesting. First shift over the counter that inch, to line up with the lower counter. Then take some of the barnboard and incorporate it vertically down into and up out of that 1" end-gap at the wall end, say up in the air by a foot high. Then screw a 3" or whatever relatively narrow shelf board ontop of it. And set on that shelf some things that make sense, like spices, napkins, containers holding pens or toothpicks, straws, mints, maybe a skinny vase, etc.
 
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Old 01-28-10, 09:52 AM
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It's really hard to picture what you are saying. Is it possible to move the short counter over 1/4" and split the difference?
 
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Old 01-28-10, 11:17 AM
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Here's the photo bucket links:

Breakfast_Bar pictures by bob_crane - Photobucket


Here's the bad news:
We liquid nailed the breakfast bar to the top of the wall (rookie mistake, I know). I'd set it on, saw it was short, had my wife and friend look it over, we decided we could make it work.

After it was up and we looked at it from the kitchen side we realized it looks bad. The next day we realized we would have been better off losing the 1/2" on the opposite side (which is parallel to the hall) and just putting some quarter round on the top of the the wall on that side to hide it. Too little too late.

The pics don't include the opposite end of the counter. The wall it sits on is an "L" shaped extension of the wall that divides the kitchen from the hallway.
 
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Old 01-28-10, 11:26 AM
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Thanks for all the replies thus far.
 
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Old 01-28-10, 11:56 AM
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Bob, so you are saying it can't be moved down toward the end of the wall, since it is attached at the other end at an "L"? I believe I would be tempted to biscuit on a breadboard extension of the same material, say about 1 1/2" longer. Not sure it would work, since we can see all the sides at once. Just a thought.
 
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Old 01-28-10, 01:04 PM
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Not exactly. I'm saying it can't be moved because I glued it in place.


The shape of the wall is this: (H = Half Height, F = Full)

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH
H
H Kitchen Counter
H
H
F
F Kitchen
F
F
F
F
F

To the left of this wall is the hall. The "Square" this forms is the kicthen with L shaped counters running down the inside of both of these walls.
To the right of the kitchen counter and breakfast bar is the entry point for the kitchen from the living room.
 
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Old 01-28-10, 02:15 PM
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You've already got a breadboard end on as Chandler suggested. You can add on to that by using a router guided by a straight edge to trim the end back to straighten and square it up, maybe a 1/4" or so. Then cut and joint a piece to glue on to lengthen the top. You can use biscuits to hold it even, but you don't need them for strength. If those are screw or nail heads showing on the end, be sure to set them back far enough to miss them with the router. Use a double flute straight edge router bit to do the cut. Also be aware that if the breadboard is glued solid across the top, the top will likely split with cross grain movement due to seasonal change in moisture. Good luck
 
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Old 01-28-10, 04:46 PM
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I've added 4 more pics from other angles so you can see how the "bar" works with the rest of the room.
Breakfast_Bar pictures by bob_crane - Photobucket

I'm hoping for some trim options to hide this a bit rather than surgery on the countertop itself.

Thanks for all your replies. Sorry it has been pulling teeth to get all the info. Wasn't sure what was pertinent and didn't want to be verbose.
 
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Old 01-29-10, 10:10 AM
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As you wish,but the problem is that the top is too short, and there's no way I know of to "trim" your way out of it without it looking amateurish. You could remove the drywall from the end, as you mentioned in your first post, then remove the end 2 X 4 stud & replace it with a 1 X 4 to gain 1 1/4". You'll need to cut the sill & plate (bottom & top 2 X 4) back to match it, which will mean filling in the floor, but that's another project. Face that with a piece of 1 X 6" pine cut to 5", stained & finished to match the bar top. The finished 1 X 6 should end up flush with the cabinet end. Put the wainscoting on the wall under the bar top leaving a small reveal on the end cap. I'm assuming the wainscoting will be 1/4" thick plywood. If it's thicker cut the end cap wider to compensate. On the wall end you could carefully cut the drywall using a utility knife guided by a level down far enough to fit in a 1/2" thick piece of pine flush with the bar top and wall. Good luck
 
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Old 01-29-10, 02:17 PM
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The verdict is in, you need surgery to make it look right. It really shouldn't be that difficult to either use a router to trim it back or a saw. Better yet cut it right at the glue joint. The only problem is at the end since you can't get either tool close enough. I would reach for my multi tool that I picked up at Harbor Freight for $34 dollars and use that in combination with the saw or router. It takes time but you can get right up to the edge with the multi tool. Once trimmed of square glue on a new piece. I don't think you would need to use any fasteners.
 
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Old 01-30-10, 06:56 PM
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Use a sawzall with a long blade to cut the liquid nails to free that top and get it fixed. You will spend more time and effort trying to figure out a way to "make it work" than fixing the top. And get some better support for it. It looks all wonky in the pics.
 
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Old 02-01-10, 11:32 AM
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Drooplug read my mind.

Thanks for all the replies. You guys know your stuff. After kicking it around here and with friends, the best solution will be to pull the counter and take it back to the guy to get it fixed.

Is the sawzall the best method to separate the 2x4 from the countertop? The entire top of the 2x4 has a bead of liquid nails running across it.
 
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Old 02-01-10, 11:43 AM
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Oh, and the support was just temporary because HomeDepot didn't have the angle iron I wanted.
 
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Old 02-01-10, 07:51 PM
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You can probably separate it by driving wood shims in from both sides until it lets go. If one thickness doesn't do it, double them up. Shouldn't take too long.
 
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