building a laundry pedastal

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Old 02-19-10, 10:24 AM
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building a laundry pedastal

First, I couldn't find a good category for this, so I hope its appropriate to post here.

Bought a new home, some signs of basement flooding in the past, so I want to put my new washer/dryer on a pedastal in case of flooding. However, these things are expensive so I wanted to build my own.

I bought 4 bricks and cut a door in half and setup a makeshift pedastal. Works good for the dryer. However, the washer spins considerably faster and cause the wood to slip off the bricks.

So how do I fix this issue? I was thinking add 2 more bricks in the middle to add more resistance between the wood and the bricks. And to buy sturdier wood since the fake wood in doors may be too slippery?

Maybe I could also glue the wood to the bricks? I'm not very creative, so let me know what you guys would do.
 
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Old 02-19-10, 11:05 AM
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Whatever you build, build it like a brick ****house. It must be solid with no lateral movement. Glad you didn't invest in the $350 drawer type pedestals. The actually accentuate the vibration of the washer and make it horribly noisy. I would use pressure treated 2x4's and build a frame about 1" narrower on all sides than the washer/dryer combo is with cross bracing at 45 degree angles on all sides. Use decking screws to assemble it. Then you can apply 3/4" plywood sides on all 4 sides and cut a top to overlap your sides to hide the vertical grain of the sides. Use screws to apply the plywood. The pressure treated lumber will tend to repel any water problems that may arise and stave off rotting for a few years should you get a flood.
Don't add doors as that will weaken the entire structure. Sorry. My wife frowned, too, but c'est la vie.
 
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Old 02-19-10, 11:26 AM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
Whatever you build, build it like a brick ****house. It must be solid with no lateral movement. Glad you didn't invest in the $350 drawer type pedestals. The actually accentuate the vibration of the washer and make it horribly noisy. I would use pressure treated 2x4's and build a frame about 1" narrower on all sides than the washer/dryer combo is with cross bracing at 45 degree angles on all sides. Use decking screws to assemble it. Then you can apply 3/4" plywood sides on all 4 sides and cut a top to overlap your sides to hide the vertical grain of the sides. Use screws to apply the plywood. The pressure treated lumber will tend to repel any water problems that may arise and stave off rotting for a few years should you get a flood.
Don't add doors as that will weaken the entire structure. Sorry. My wife frowned, too, but c'est la vie.
Thansk for the reply! oh man so my brick idea was no good??

Why would an all wood solution be less slippery? The new wood pedastal would still be on top of the cement floor. Wouldn't it still move?

Also, I just realized the washer may have sort of legs. I think they were round and plastic. Do I need to remove those?


But assuming I take on this project to build the pedastal, I have some questions since I'm not that familiar with woodworking. And to clarify, this washer/dryer are not mounted on top of each other, they are separate.

1) Why is the frame 1" narrower? Even with the 3/4" plywood, thats 1/4" narrower than the washer. Shouldn't it be wider than the washer in case the washer moves?

2) not sure what cross bracing is. Is it something like this? :

3) And how tall would you make the platform? Right now it's under a foot. Is cross bracing still a god idea for that?

4) I have a dewalt circular saw to cut the 2 by 4s. But I just have the standard blade it came with, is that good enough. I think it has like 20 teeth or so.
 
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Old 02-19-10, 12:21 PM
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The wood will spread out the weight and movement of the washer. Your brick have a small unstable footing. I used the term "combo" errantly. I knew they were separate.
1) the 1" narrower will bring the entire unit to 1/2" wider once you have applied all the 3/4" plywood sides. You can build it wider if you want, just as a carpenter, we are always aware of the overall size and deduct for sheathing when we build frames.
2) Exactly
3)1' is fine, but if you want it taller, then you should cross brace it. I believe the ones you buy are about 18" tall.
4) The circle saw is just fine for this work. Hope you have a drill.
You may want to edge the entire build up with a 1x2 just to keep the possibility of the washer from walking off the pedestal. Doubtful it will as its weight will cause it to indent the plywood anyway.
 
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Old 02-19-10, 04:02 PM
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Something like this: If you use 2x12 pressure treated lumber and 3/4 ply on top you will have about 12 inches of height off the ground. Not sure of the height you are looking for. You can make a second frame and attach them together if you need more height. If after that you are still worried about movement you can use concrete anchors to secure it to the ground. Attach corner blocks to the frame and than bolt it down through those. I attached a crude pic.
http://i847.photobucket.com/albums/a...and/washer.jpg
 
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