Finding inside angles..?

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Old 02-22-10, 11:42 AM
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Finding inside angles..?

I need to install chair rail and crown in a room with some bay windows..

Need help on proper device to use to find the inside angles? Perhaps something i can pickup at lowes or HD, because I'd like to get done this weekend.

Any thoughts?
 
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Old 02-22-10, 01:10 PM
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If you have a chop saw, it is easy to cut a few test pieces. Where are you concerned about for measuring?

Bud
 
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Old 02-22-10, 01:25 PM
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Yeah, I have a Hitachi miter saw. I just didn't want to waste anything, but I guess it's probably the "quicker" way of going about it, versus ordering something and waiting for it to arive.
 
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Old 02-22-10, 02:50 PM
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you can use a t-bevel. you can get them at Lowes or HD. Put it in the corner and swing it till it matches the angle. Then put it on your mitre saw and swing the saw to the angle. Cut the pieces half the degrees you find from the t-bevel should work. While you are at the store you might think about getting some scrap wood they may have or a cheep piece of pine to test it out. Better to cut a cheep piece of pine then to cut your molding. Hope I explained it well enough and good luck. Post a pic when you are done.
 
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Old 02-22-10, 06:56 PM
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Originally Posted by wsaend View Post
you can use a t-bevel. you can get them at Lowes or HD. Put it in the corner and swing it till it matches the angle. Then put it on your mitre saw and swing the saw to the angle. Cut the pieces half the degrees you find from the t-bevel should work. While you are at the store you might think about getting some scrap wood they may have or a cheep piece of pine to test it out. Better to cut a cheep piece of pine then to cut your molding. Hope I explained it well enough and good luck. Post a pic when you are done.
Any good links on how to best use a t-bevel? I thought about picking one up yesterday knowing that this was an option, but i have no idea how to use one
 
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Old 02-22-10, 07:23 PM
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I think wsaend covered the basics in his last reply.

You loosen the wingnut, put the sliding t-bevel in the corner you want to match, push the handle onto one wall, unfold the sliding part so that it's longest point is extended out onto the other wall, then lock the wingnut. Now you have a "pattern" that matches the angle of the corner.

You can take that pattern, set it on your miter saw, put the handle against the fence, and turn the miter adjustment on your miter saw until the slot for the saw blade lines up (matches) the angle that is on the blade of your sliding t-bevel, and read what it says. Let's say the miter saw angle matches the sliding t-bevel angle at 30 degrees. (90+30 means it is a 120 degree angle) Bisect that 30 degree miter... two 15 degree miter cuts when butted together point to point, should meet perfectly in that corner.

But as wsaend said, get some cheap scraps of wood to test your angles first. Cut those two 15 degree angles on a scrap and hold them together in the corner to make sure they fit nicely. If they don't, you probably just need to make a small adjustment and cut them again. The sliding t-bevel is a nice gauge to get you in the ballpark, but if you want a precision fit it will likely need a little tweaking.
 
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Old 02-22-10, 07:33 PM
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"tweaking" is the correct word. Example, a 90 degree inside corner would normally need two 45's to form the angle. But the tape and mud have turned the corner into a 92 degree angle. So you go with two 46 degree cuts. But things are never perfect and when you push the wood tight into the corner, you notice the joint on the outside opens up a bit. That is because the wood has bowed slightly to form to the corner. So, tweak your cuts, whatever angle, so the exposed seam is always tight and if a gap does exist, it is hidden to the inside.

Have fun
Bud
 
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Old 02-23-10, 04:38 AM
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Beautiful info.. THANK YOU GUYS.. Really appreciate it.
 
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