Any tricks for removing threaded inserts

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Old 04-07-10, 08:19 AM
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Question Any tricks for removing threaded inserts

I'm trying to rebuild a bench that is put together with bolt and threaded inserts. I can't get the inserts out of the old boards. New inserts have a slot for a screwdriver, these do not. I could just cut the boards or try to chisel them out but I want to reuse them.

Someone once told me a trick using a bolt and a couple of nuts. Anybody know it and how to do it???

I could just replace the inserts but there are a lot of them and they are pretty pricey for an old bench for the flower garden.
 
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Old 04-07-10, 08:29 AM
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Check to see if the inserts have a hex shape on one or both ends. Last ones I used did. Much easier to install correctly with an allen wrench, no problem keeping the straight in the holes.

Normally the wrench will be just slightly bigger than the required bolt.
 
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Old 04-07-10, 03:34 PM
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I have the feeling that whomever put these in put them in upside down. There is no hex head or screwdriver slot.

Trying to get them out, but still be able to reuse them.
 
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Old 04-07-10, 10:23 PM
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they make boring bits not sure of their name but they would probably work for you. Woodcraft sells them.
 
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Old 04-07-10, 10:34 PM
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they are called screw extractors but they only go to 3/8ths. You may be able to find them elsewhere. Good luck. They sell them at Rockler also. These drill a hole a bit larger than the screw.
 
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Old 04-07-10, 10:54 PM
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Not sure I know what I'm talking about, but I'll try. I have used two types of threaded inserts. One is pulled into the wood from the opposite side and uses a hex or splines to keep it from rotating. The other threads in from the same side as the bolt to provide a longer wearing surface so the bolts can be removed and re-installed repeatedly. Guessing you are dealing with the latter.

The double nut method uses a bolt with two nuts on the shaft. Thread the bolt into the threaded insert, tighten the lower nut tight against the insert, then hold the lower nut and tighten the upper nut against the lower. Hopefully that locks everything together and will back the threaded insert out as you remove the bolt. Doesn't always work. Sometimes adding a split lock washer will help to bite into the insert.

The other approach is to use a Dremel tool to cut a screwdriver slot across the top.

Are you re-using the wood? If not, a soldering iron might affect the wood enough, or any glue that may have been used, to permit removal.

I'm empty,
Bud
 
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Old 04-08-10, 04:45 PM
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Bud
That's the trick I was looking for. Adding the lock washer created just enough pressure against the little suckers to back them out. The first time I tried the 2 nut method it just unthread the bolt. I was right they were put in upside down, there is a slot on the end that was buried. I probably should have mentioned they were embedded in oak.

wsaend
A screw extractor bores into the screwhead and when put into reverse removes a broken screw. The other thing, that bores a hole around, is called a plug cutter. I probably could have taken that route, just don't have one the right size in my shop. The one I have is a 1/2" and would have left me with a plug with my insert still inside it.

I did finally get them out. I did go price some new ones at the local hardware, they were $1.40 each. I needed 16.

Thanks for the help
 
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Old 04-08-10, 08:18 PM
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they have ones that are designed for screw extraction. They are made so that you can fill it with a button or dowel. It is not a plug cutter. I know the difference, But thanks. Probably pretty close to same thing only called different.
 
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Old 04-09-10, 06:47 AM
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wsaend
My apologies, never knew such a tool existed. I went to Rockler's website and searched it. It appears from the reviews I read it isn't worth the time it took to design. According to most it didn't live up to their expectations.
I do think a plug cutter would have worked though, didn't think of that one, but like I said I don't have one the right size to have done the job.

Do appreciate learning about new tools though. A man can NEVER have too many tools :D :thumbup:
 

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Old 04-09-10, 01:05 PM
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Yeah, it was just an idea I don't always have the best ones, but as a last resort i thought it might work. No worries i take things to personal sometimes. Glad the nuts work for you a great idea to keep in the OOPS bin.
 
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Old 04-09-10, 04:27 PM
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wsaend
One of the guys on a woodworking forum I belong to came up with a tip I hope to soon be able to find the time to follow up on.

When he gets a new magazine he makes copies of articles, tips and plans that interest him. He then puts them in notebooks. The notebooks are divided into catagories, example; a tips and tricks notebook. That is broken into sections like router tips, table saw tips, ect.
He has one for jigs for each machine too. My problem is I have a stack of magazines 3' tall (no lie) and I haven't had the time to do it. Notice I said when he gets it, not after he has a stack.
LOML keeps threatening to throw them out so I suppose I better get startedBeer 4U2
 
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Old 04-09-10, 04:46 PM
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I hide mine in boxes labeled TOOLS. All my owner manuals and mags go in there. I like the notebook idea though, does he make house calls. I was thinking about scanning some of them. I have about 20 gigs of videos I downloaded.
 
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