Garage shelving


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Old 04-26-11, 07:05 AM
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Garage shelving

I'm looking at installing some shelving in my garage. The garage is 21' x 24' with 2 single stall doors. What I plan on doing is mounting shelving around the inside perimeter 2' from the ceiling (unfinished) from the back of one assembly all the way around to the back of the other. I've built a similar system in my previous garage and it worked well, but was much smaller in scale (just one wall with dual shelves about 10' long).

Studs are 16" on center and what I am looking at doing is mounting these brackets every other stud so there is a 32" span.

Knape & Vogt Heavy Duty 22" L Bracket


I'd do every stud, but that would mean twice the cost and prevent me from sliding longer items like canoe paddles, trimmer, pole saw, etc... in the triangle of the bracket which I did before in my previous garage and it worked well.

I would be placing 3/4" pine plywood sheets ripped to 2' depth on top and securing with wood screws.

My question is about the 32" span. Is 3/4" ply enough for this. I don't plan on any individual item being placed up there that is more than 30-40 pounds. It'll mostly be storage of totes and boxes.

Should I add a 2x4" along the back between each bracket for added support?

Thanks
 
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Old 04-26-11, 07:42 AM
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I think it would prob be fine. I have an 18" deep shelf above a 5' window in my garage. I used a 2x2 along the wall in addition to 2 brackets similar to yours on each side of the window. I also attached 1 1/4 x 1 1/4 steel angle to the front lip (just because I already had it). Probably would have screwed and glued another 2x2 if I hadn't had the angle. My shelf is made from melamine coated particle board (again, just because I had it), and hasn't bowed at all even with 20-30 lb tool cases and storage totes.

Try and center any heavy weights directly above the brackets.
 
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Old 04-28-11, 02:38 PM
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Another option

Ok, so I measured it out and skipping every other stud to make it a 32" span between the brackets it would take me 16 of them. While it's not exuberantly expensive, that's still $150+ shipped just for brackets and not including the decking cost. I did some more searching and came along these plans for wood shelf supports/brackets

Link

My only concern is getting the depth I'd like out of these. Optimally I'd want at least 20" of depth. I can 2 in. x 10 in. x 10 ft. Pressure-Treated Pine Lumber boards for $9 and get 6 - 10" x 20" brackets out of each board. Even if I put on each stud for a span of only 16" and used a total of 32 of them I'd only be at $54 for brackets cost.

I'd use there two screw method on the bottom and one on top countersunk into the stud as well for extra security.

Thoughts?
 
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Old 04-28-11, 03:36 PM
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2 x 10 x 10 for $9? Wow ...where do you live!? I wouldn't use PT though..more flaws and checks/splits as they dry. Also...which side (stud or shelf) would get the short side? That seems that it would put a lot of leverage on it. If you have the tools, you'd be better off rabbiting 2x2 or 2x4 and using 3/4 ply glued in.

Have you checked locally for some similar brackets that you linked to originally?

You know....I just realized...this would probably get more replies in the carpentry or woodworking section.

Let me know and I'll move it....cause I'm sure no expert!
 
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Old 04-28-11, 08:43 PM
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MN Vic, those boards are at HD here.

I was thinking the stud would get the short side. I don't plan on loading these with heavy things, just some totes, camping gear, boxes of spray paint cans, etc...

I'm handy, but not much of a woodworker. Can you explain this a bit better or point me in the right direction - "better off rabbiting 2x2 or 2x4 and using 3/4 ply glued in"?

Please do move this if it would get more hits in one of those sections.
 
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Old 04-29-11, 03:37 AM
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Before Vic moves it......Making the bracket is fine, but very time consuming. You will have the grain of the wood to deal with, and as mentioned any drying of the wood could tend to allow it to crack across grain making the bracket useless. IMO, use the metal brackets. That way you would gain the use of the triangle as you stated you liked. For shelving, a good cabinet grade (7 to 13 ply) plywood would stand the span as long as you screwed it to the brackets. Since you will have a slight overhang, I would glue and nail a 2" face along the edge of your plywood for more strength between the brackets. It won't be in the way and will help prevent bowing in case you decide to store 5 bowling balls in a 32" span . Your cost factor will degrade as soon as you start making all those brackets. The $55 or so is a frustration factor.

Larry
 
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Old 05-02-11, 07:43 AM
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Thanks Chandler, I've decide to go with the metal brackets as I found 20" ones locally for a better price and can save on shipping. I'll just keep them to 22" depth shelves now to minimize the amount of overhang.

Would a 1"x2" along the front face be sufficient? Any specific species or would pine be sufficient?
 
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Old 05-02-11, 04:11 PM
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Pine would be good. If you don't have an appearance problem, 3/4" plywood would be better because it can stand more lateral movement due to the layers. Either would be good.
 
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Old 05-02-11, 04:50 PM
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Just a note...the wider side should be vertical for more stiffness. I think that's what chandler might have meant?

Also...if you can sand it after assy...a poly glue like Gorilla might be a bit stronger...since you probably will be gluing to the finished face of the ply...and (in my experience) regular wood glue needs to penetrate somewhat.
 
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Old 05-02-11, 05:20 PM
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Yeah, buddy! Wasn't clear. Thanks Vic. Just rip some 2" or so pieces of 3/4" plywood and use it to stiffen the edge of the shelving, using it instead of dimension lumber 1x2. Wood glue, absolutely! I like to use Titebond II.
 
 

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