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Unsightly and visible Formica joints and edges. Expert advise needed

Unsightly and visible Formica joints and edges. Expert advise needed

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  #1  
Old 09-10-11, 07:19 PM
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Unsightly and visible Formica joints and edges. Expert advise needed

Please advise what repair works must be done to solve the problems to conceal the seams, joints and edges? # 3 images attached to show the problems. Thanks a lot.



 
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  #2  
Old 09-11-11, 04:09 PM
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Maybe you can find some moldings.
 
  #3  
Old 09-11-11, 04:31 PM
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I suppose you could take some white or off white paint and smear it on the edges to cover the edges of the joints. Just be sure to have clean rags and the appropriate thinner [water or solvent] to clean off the formica itself.
 
  #4  
Old 09-11-11, 04:33 PM
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I don't think paint would hide that at all. Paint makes things like that worse.
 
  #5  
Old 09-11-11, 04:46 PM
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I"m not sure what you expect with white formica. Yeah, it isn't best trim job in the world, but it comes with the territory. IMO, molding would be an ever increasing job. Where do you stop. If you run it up one stile, what do you do with the top of the molding? It would make it look heavier as well. Molding may prevent door and drawer closure.
I'll have to throw my hat in the paint ring, this time. I hate to paint. But a good, really good covering paint may take your eyes away from it. Close up, you will still have ill trimmed edges. You can't let the paint get onto the cabinets themselves, as the color differences would really stand out. Wiping, as Marksr, suggests would minimize it.
These appear to be 1980's or so, made from mdf, so their life expectancy isn't all that great. They look clean, and may give good service, but I would opt for new cabinets if possible for the long run.
 
  #6  
Old 09-11-11, 05:12 PM
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If you can find someone who does car pin-striping, that might work too. A *very* thin vinyl tape that would have excellent adhesion. Even then, the color would probably be off. The same could be said for paint. If you masked the edges off and painted a very thin line, the paint would have to be dead on or else your eye will still be drawn to it. But I suppose it would be better than a black/charcoal colored line.

Otherwise, it's like chandler said, what do you expect with white formica? That's pretty normal.
 
  #7  
Old 09-11-11, 07:43 PM
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I think this is new stuff. Certainly not a kitchen either. And the formica isn't just a solid color. This is the nature of the beast. Formica is not the same color all the way through. If that seam in the middle picture was made on site, you can't expect much more than that.
 
  #8  
Old 09-11-11, 08:02 PM
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Got to ask is this the first time you have seen a Formica job? Are you confusing it with factory applied Melamine finishes? Formica edges are trimmed with a 22° bit to actually expose more then a 90° bit would.

That said there do seem to be a couple of rough edges. If new I would ask the installer to correct those.
 
  #9  
Old 09-11-11, 11:50 PM
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No. I have not seen a Formica job. However, I can confirm that it is Formica laminate material glued on by my installer in my premise.
All I see is that the workmanship is real bad. I have been told you should not be able to see joints and edges had you applied the right methods and edge trims. The installer could possibly be trying to save on material cost.
My longer term concern is to avoid defects and having to keep calling the installer to make good. The installer may just remedy by doing a patch up job.
Can the installation be done in a proper manner that the visible joints and edges become invisible?
Perhaps someone from Formica Company cal also comment about the remedy?
Thanks.
 
  #10  
Old 09-11-11, 11:55 PM
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Image was take from my new bedroom. Dream or nightmare? Anyway suggestion to make good from a carpentry perspective?
 
  #11  
Old 09-12-11, 12:01 AM
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I am beginning to have a very painful lesson to have full trust on my installer. Thanks for one solution for the edges. Any idea to make the joints invisible?
 
  #12  
Old 09-12-11, 12:06 AM
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Look like you are right. Long run may be to opt for new cabinets rather than painting. No more stress and frustrations. Thanks.
 
  #13  
Old 09-12-11, 12:11 AM
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I have been told you should not be able to see joints and edges
Wrong. Joints should match a much as possible but won't be invisible. Edges show a dark line because of the way they are finished. I have never seen them with out a dark line.

right methods and edge trims.
Edge trims are traditionally not used with Formica. I really think the main problem is wrong information about what a Formica install looks like.
 
  #14  
Old 09-12-11, 12:15 AM
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I must be almost sure if not 100% on what to do next. I cannot afford to make another costly blunder to further transform my home from nightmare to hell. Let me gather more feed backs on what to do. Can you get someone from Formica Company to provide their advice? Thanks a lot.
 
  #15  
Old 09-12-11, 04:37 AM
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If your color had been anything but white, you would have not noticed it as much. The example below was manufactured in a factory setting, and as you see the edges show as a dark line. Not as noticeable as white, but it is just "formica", or high pressure laminate. I hope someone else can give you better advice, but so far you have had the best of the best. Also, Formica is your link to formica.

 
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