Best Glue for Wooden Spoons

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Old 02-10-12, 08:28 PM
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Best Glue for Wooden Spoons

I'm thinking of experimenting with making laminated spoons. I believe I've read that most glue is non-toxic once dried. If that's correct, I'd like to suggestions about the best glue that'll stand up to liquids. Any ideas out there?
 
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Old 02-11-12, 07:03 AM
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I don't know about any of the toxicity issues with dried glue, but the best glues I have used for wet locations is waterproof wood glue (such as Tightbond III) and polyurethane glue (such as Gorilla glue)
 
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Old 02-11-12, 07:04 AM
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Titebond III is the type of glue you want.
 
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Old 02-11-12, 09:18 AM
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Tightbond III? It's that easy. Sweet. Thanks for the info.
 
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Old 02-11-12, 03:50 PM
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I agree titebond is the best wood glue.........but not sure I would use it for preping edible stuff. If you can make a spoon with laminated wood, why not as a single piece. Yeah I know, it is about the look of the piece!!!!!!!!!!! Do the look for decoration, not for fixing my dinner.
 
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Old 02-11-12, 04:23 PM
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Titebond III is not waterproof, it is water resistant. It will not survive being soaked in water.

I would also be concerned with heat when it comes to the spoons. I wouldn't expect any of the non-toxic status of glues to remain that way when heat is applied.
 
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Old 02-11-12, 04:30 PM
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This is from their website

"Not for continuous submersion or for use below the waterline. "
 
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Old 02-11-12, 05:20 PM
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Huhm. I'm still going to give this a try, but it looks like these spoons will be spending their lives NOT in the kitchen. Thanks for the info, guys.
 
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Old 02-11-12, 05:36 PM
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Not sure what your point is, drooplug. Their website SAYS it is "waterproof". The key word is that Titebond III is not for "continuous" submersion. (Such as a patch on the bottom of a boat.) It is the ideal glue for products that will be exposed to wet conditions temporarily. I would assume that even if the spoon WAS for kitchen use, when the spoon is not in use it would be sitting in a drawer where it could dry out.

Titebond III also is FDA approved for indirect food contact (cutting boards)... and other wood utensils, I would assume.

According to their web site (quoted below), Titebond III meets ANSI/HPVA Type I standards:

"The test for Type I is clearly more stringent than Type II, and involves boiling the glue bonds and testing the specimens while they are wet.

Type I testing involves cutting the 6" by 6" assemblies into 1" by 3" specimens, boiling them for 4 hours, then baking the specimens in a 145F oven for 20 hours. They are boiled for an additional 4 hours, then immediately cooled using running water. The specimens are sheared while wet, and the bonds must pass certain strength and wood failure requirements to pass the Type I specification."

Sounds like the product had to be both heated AND submerged- at least for a time- in order to pass this testing. Boiling water is 212F, no?
 
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Old 02-12-12, 05:27 AM
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Type I testing involves cutting the 6" by 6" assemblies into 1" by 3" specimens, boiling them for 4 hours, then baking the specimens in a 145F oven for 20 hours. They are boiled for an additional 4 hours, then immediately cooled using running water. The specimens are sheared while wet, and the bonds must pass certain strength and wood failure requirements to pass the Type I specification."

Sounds like the product had to be both heated AND submerged- at least for a time- in order to pass this testing. Boiling water is 212F, no?
Well there you have it. Looks like a good choice.

I got myself a bit confused last night when reading their site. I didn't know the details of the test either. The bit about submersion gave me the impression that having it sit in a sink of water overnight could be a problem. Obviously this is not the case.

I did have a concern about the heat delaminating the glue, but it seems that is not an issue either. My other concern with the heat is that it may release toxic binders. I know this is a problem with other plastics which is why they shouldn't be used in hot environments unless it is clearly marked as ok. I don't know if this is an issue with the glue or not. I wouldn't have a problem using it on a cutting board, but for something that I would use to stir my pasta while it cooks, I wouldn't. At least not without further research.
 
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Old 02-12-12, 06:24 AM
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Hey, I'd give it a try... it might make my wife's soups taste better.
 
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Old 02-12-12, 07:15 AM
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Boiling water is 212F, no?
Only at sea level. Here at 7,000' MSL, water boils at 199F
 
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Old 02-12-12, 07:41 AM
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Don't forget to figure in the barometric pressure!
 
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Old 02-12-12, 08:49 AM
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And any impurities in the water.

Have you looked at marine glues?
 
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