Wood species resembling Beech


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Old 09-24-12, 10:06 AM
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Wood species resembling Beech

My wife recenty ordered new cabinets for the kitchen (STICKER SHOCK!) in Beech wood. I"m going to be installing a new pocket door, and also new trim around the kitchen and wood like a similar look, but finding doors/trim in Beech has been impossible. Does anyone know what kind of wood would closely resemble Beech after staining?

Thanks!
 
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Old 09-24-12, 11:31 AM
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White pine is light colored and takes stain well, for the trim. For the door: Veneered Flush Beech.
 
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Old 09-24-12, 01:43 PM
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Pine should work well for the wood work but you might want to use a wood conditioner first. It slightly seals the wood so it will take the stain more evenly. Porous areas of the wood tend to take too much stain [dark] and the hard areas will be light. It might take a slightly darker stain to get the color right.
 
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Old 09-24-12, 04:13 PM
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Thanks guys. That helps!
 
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Old 09-24-12, 04:23 PM
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Mark is a professional painter. That's solid advice he's offered about the stain work.
 
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Old 09-24-12, 05:32 PM
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I'd ask if Alder is available. I don't think you would be happy with the way pine looks with beech. Maple would be another choice. A lot of it depends on how your beech looks. Some of it is has lots of open pores, which alters the look quite a bit.
 
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Old 09-24-12, 05:55 PM
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I agree with Sleeper. Alder looks quite a lot like Beech.

Now to clear up any confusion. I work for a company that sells raw wood lumber, molding, ply-board etc. I deliver it to mostly cabinet shops. I personally do not work with wood as in building things, nor do I stain wood... which is what you asked about specifically. So, my opinion may not be accurate regarding its look after stain. However, the two raw woods do look very similar including color.

Hope this helps & hope I didn't confuse anything
Best wishes & good luck with your project.
TC
 
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Old 09-24-12, 06:00 PM
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Hmm. I haven't worked with a pine a whole lot, but it might do the trick. You should buy yourself a small piece of pine (or whatever wood you choose) and do some stain samples before committing yourself.

I was talking to a coworker of mine not too long ago and we both agreed that beech is underrated and underused. I recently made a vanity out of european beech for my brother and I really love the wood. I think the wood looks great with just a clear finish, but he decided to stain it. I can't say I agree with his decision, but here is a picture of before and after.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/drooplug/8021536383/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/drooplug/8021539418/

I did not do the finish work so I don't know exactly what finish schedule was used. I'm fairly sure the finisher just applied stain and then sprayed some lacquer on it. You can see how the stain took really dark in some areas and light in others. I think pine may do the same.
 
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Old 09-24-12, 06:09 PM
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Couldn't see the pics unless I registered an account

I don't know that I've ever stained/finished any beech wood but any wood that has soft and hard spots like pine can use a wood conditioner to semi-seal the wood so the stain color is more even. I usually make my own wood conditioner by thinning sanding sealer about 50-60%

On some projects not conditioning the wood is fine, it all depends on how tolerant you [or the customer] are with the different colors naturally in the wood.
 
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Old 09-24-12, 06:13 PM
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I have a registered account... but the photos are in a "private" folder. Maybe if he makes them public we can take a look. Sounds nice.
 
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Old 09-24-12, 06:14 PM
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Gah! Ok, the links should work now.
 
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Old 09-24-12, 06:18 PM
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Yippee, it works

Looks nice! personally I like the color differences in the finished piece.
 
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Old 09-24-12, 06:19 PM
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Nice piece! Yeah a conditoner would have toned that contrast down a little, but it looks nice!
 
 

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