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white trim-- builder may use flat paint. will i have to touch up a lot?

white trim-- builder may use flat paint. will i have to touch up a lot?

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Old 04-24-13, 10:14 AM
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white trim-- builder may use flat paint. will i have to touch up a lot?

Hello, first time posting. My husband and I are building a home and we are "upgrading" by having the trim painted white. The cost is pretty steep (imo)-- approx $800 for painted trim throughout house. The paint that they'll use is most likely going to be a flat paint. From what I've read, flat paint is not washable and therefore, is hard to keep clean.

What type of paint finish is best for white trim? This is our first home-- all of our rentals have had oak trim, so we never notice it if it's dirty.

If they're going to use flat paint only and you think we'd have to touch it up or paint over it ourselves with a satin finish paint (what I've read most people use), I'm thinking we should save money and go with the standard trim. Does that make sense??

If there is some sort of varnish or if the standard trim is stained-- what is the best prep for it? I'd only elect to go with standard trim if prep doesn't involve sanding everything down first.
 
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Old 04-24-13, 10:32 AM
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Flat paint is not appropriate for trim...as you've noted. Hard to believe thats what the painter would use.

I'm also surprised they are charging so much as they can use a lower grade of trim thus saving them money. Also, the trim will probably be sprayed before install just requiring a top coat afterwards.

I guess with stained trim they can do all the prep and then just have to fill nail holes after it's installed....but the material normally costs more.

As I hate painting (because I'm not good at it probably) I would not want to have to go back and paint all the trim after you take possession....you'll have plenty of other things to do.

I'd get with the contractor and clarify on the flat vs satin paint...and if they won't use satin...I'd get the stained trim. You would have to lightly sand stained trim before painting...but not real aggressively. You may need to prime also...would have to let one of our paint Pro's answer that.
 
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Old 04-24-13, 10:50 AM
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Welcome to the forum.

I'm supprised they are considering painting the trip an upgrade. When my parent's built their house, all the trim was painted before installing. Made it super easy for a kid (helper) to simply roller the trim in one batch. Only the nail holes as Vic mentioned where left to touch up.

If you hadn't upgraded, how would the trim be finished?
 
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Old 04-24-13, 11:15 AM
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thanks for the responses.

think the home specialist said that the "painted wood" is pine because it takes paint better. I think it we didn't "upgrade" it it'd be maple. Not 100% sure as we knew we wanted to have white trim. I'm attaching a photo (hope it goes through). The bottom three trim samples are what the "basic" trim looks like before staining/painting. It does look to be maple.. and I think it is because stained "upgraded" trim is maple or cherry.

I'll double check with the builder to see what paint the painters will use on trim. This isn't just baseboard trim.. it's trim everywhere. doors, windows, etc.
 
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Old 04-24-13, 11:22 AM
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Painted pine costs more than stained maple/cherry? In what world is that happening? Thats completely opposite of anything I've ever experienced or heard.

I think there is a communication problem.
 
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Old 04-24-13, 11:35 AM
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I don't know how much it would cost extra to have the standard trim stained a different color. But I suspect it will be close to the cost of painted trim. If we just went with the standard, it would be the "natural" colored maple.

Supposedly the extra cost for painted trim is because they have to paint it twice (aka "more labor"). Seriously, that is what we were told. You have to paint it once, then when it's installed and holes are put in, they have to go over it again.
 
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Old 04-24-13, 11:45 AM
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Well, that's pretty much what I said earlier in my first post....but I'm surprised the material cost difference wouldn't offset the labor cost...then again I'm not a builder. Maybe it's not as big when they buy in bulk vs the homeowner buying at a big box store.

Personally....I would LOVE stained maple or cherry trim.
 
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Old 04-24-13, 11:55 AM
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Oops, you're right, you totally addressed that in your first post!

We are doing dark (almost espresso color) stained cabinets in our kitchen. I didn't want the house to be too dark, so that's why we opted for white trim. White trim, white kitchen.. that seems to be all the rage right now. It just makes a space look brighter. I've seen dark trim in houses and they do look great- don't get me wrong, but I guess I just prefer white trim.

Anyway, here's to hoping they can change the finish of the paint for the trim! They are using flat paint on the walls, etc and never specified type of finish for trim, so I am assuming they are using the SAME paint for trim. Definitely getting clarification.
 
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Old 04-24-13, 12:42 PM
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update: painted trim will be satin finish

builder just got back and said "wall and ceilings are a flat paint. all of your painted trim is a satin finish which is washable." horray.
 
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Old 04-24-13, 01:18 PM
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Figured that would be the case.....couldn't imagine otherwise.

Just to bring up another hiccup though...kitchen and baths (as well utility/laundry rooms) should not be flat. If so...you would be well advised to pay extra or repaint them yourself.

We did satin in those areas as well. Actually...I think we went semi-gloss in the laundry.
 
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Old 04-24-13, 01:38 PM
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What a bummer that, by default, they just paint everything flat.

We are planning on eventually painting the walls so I'll remember to get the correct finishes for the kitchen, bath and laundry. Satin, right? Thanks for the heads up!
 
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Old 04-24-13, 02:01 PM
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Not sure if it's still enforced but it used to be code for bath rm [with shower] to have enamel [or wallpaper] on the walls. I would for sure want latex enamel on the bath rm walls and ceilings! doesn't hurt to paint the laundry rm walls enamel either. If your builder plans on all the walls being flat, I'd either strike a deal with his painter or plan on repainting those areas before moving in.

It's cheaper to paint than it is to stain. A decent job can be had with 1 coat primer and 1 coat enamel. Stain requires the stain and 2-3 coats of poly/varnish. Painted trim gets caulked and puttied, stain woodwork just gets the colored putty. If the builder normally paints the woodwork the same color as the walls, the reason for the up charge would be because he can't prime the woodwork with the walls [not the best primer anyway] and they can cheat by not enameling the sides of the casings. Does your builder have a paint contractor? or just some of his guys playing painter? Will the walls have primer and paint? or just 1 coat of paint?

I've painted a lot of new construction and IMO $800 is mighty high to change the woodwork from wall color enamel to white enamel BUT I've been painting for a long time and cutting in the trim is no big deal. It might be to someone that isn't really a painter.

Do you know what brand and line of paint is going to be used? Some builders use what is often referred to as builder's grade of paint. IMO it just colors the walls and doesn't provide a good paint job
 
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Old 04-25-13, 09:58 AM
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This is new construction in a new subdivision, basically "owned" by the company we're building with. So everyone in this neighborhood builds with the company. So I think it's safe to say they have a paint contractor.

The brand of paint is Hallman Lindsay ("Paint made in WI for WI") in Antique Ivory.

Hm, our 6-panel interior doors are also going to be painted with this paint. What finish should it be on the doors?
 
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Old 04-25-13, 10:00 AM
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I've never heard of that brand so can't comment on it's quality.
The doors should be painted with the same enamel paint that is used on the rest of the woodwork.
 
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