What type of Wood/Varnish/Wood filler

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  #1  
Old 05-25-13, 04:35 PM
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What type of Wood/Varnish/Wood filler

Hello,
I was wondering can anyone identify this type of wood used in my project ?. I forgot my self and I want to buy a varnish and wood filler for it.
Any suggestions, what varnish is the best and bring out the best results, as well as wood filler for joints.
I know they are not the best images but what can I do with a crappy phone
Thanks
(is this any good ?BUY 3 GET 1 FREE ANTIQUE PINE VARNISH PAINT 180ml GLOSS HOME HIGH PERFORMANCE | eBay)
 
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  #2  
Old 05-25-13, 06:05 PM
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Looks like #3 white pine. If you plan on staining the wood, you will want to apply a wood conditioner to the wood just prior to staining it, to prevent the wood from being blotchy.

If this is an attempt as posting spam... well, sorry I replied.
 
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Old 05-25-13, 06:27 PM
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I agree just cheap pine.
Why do you need filler? Filler will stick out when stained.
Why varnish and not poly?
 
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Old 05-26-13, 04:30 AM
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What you mean stain the wood and by what you mean conditioner, this is all I bought
Rustins Quick Drying Clear Gloss Varnish
Flexible Sanding Pad Fine Grit
Normal painting brush
What else do I need?
I need the wood filler because they are some gaps in my joints, they are too big and it does not look good,
 
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Old 05-26-13, 04:41 AM
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http://www.mcmahons.ie/plastic-wood-...0ml-pine.html#
Is this wood filler alright to use
 
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Old 05-26-13, 04:43 AM
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Poly dries to a harder finish than varnish but the varnish will do ok. I like to use a coat of sanding sealer under varnish because it sands easier than the varnish but again, for a small job, your varnish is ok.

I'm not fond of using fillers prior to apply the varnish for the reason Joe mentioned. If you do use a filler first, you need to make sure there is none left on the wood - only in the gap. I like to use colored putty after the 1st coat of varnish/poly. Sanding and/or a damp thinner rag will remove the putty residue from the surrounding wood. You only want the putty/filler in the hole/gap - it will be unsightly anywhere else!!


I'm not familiar with the product you linked to. It looks like a tube of caulking. It will probably do ok, just make sure it's only in the crack and not smeared onto the surrounding wood. If you aren't real handy with a caulking gun you might want to tape both sides of the crack first. Remove the tape as soon as you get the caulking smoothed out.

almost forgot welcome to the forums!
 
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Old 05-26-13, 04:48 AM
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Well, this is what I was planning to do in the process of varnishing
1.Apply wood filler in gaps
2. After 30 mins or so, sand down lightly all over the project, with fine grit sand paper
3.get damp cloth and clean all the dust
4.apply varnish 1st coat,after 3 hours apply varnish 2nd coat, after 3 hours apply varnish 3rd coat
BTW this is what I bought

Rustins Quick Drying Clear Gloss Varnish
Flexible Sanding Pad Fine Grit
 
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Old 05-26-13, 04:50 AM
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Drying times can vary due to temp and humidity so make sure it's dry before sanding and going to the next coat. Always sand with the direction of the grain. Cross sanding will put unsightly scratches in the wood that can be difficult to remove.
 
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Old 05-26-13, 04:54 AM
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Thanks to all for help, to everyone
 
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Old 05-26-13, 08:02 PM
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Wasim,

in reply to your questions, "stain" is a solution of pigments, meant to color the wood... brown or red or what have you. If you are simply applying varnish, you do not need to worry about the conditioner I mentioned.

I agree that sometimes nail putties can look worse than no putty at all. If you have wood scraps I would suggest you experiment with your wood filler to see if you will be satisfied with the results. There is nothing worse than putting the finishing touches on a project that you have invested many hours in, and then screwing it up because yoiu didn't take the time to test your finish, stain, filler, etc. Adding the filler in multiple places without testing it could end up really smearing up your project.

A good way to make your own varnish sanding sealer is to just mix it 50:50 with paint thinner. (assuming it's oil based/soluble).
 
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Old 05-27-13, 05:36 AM
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A 50/50 mix is too thin for varnish to act as a sanding sealer. That is the formula for making a wash coat aka wood conditioner. It can be beneficial to thin the 1st coat of varnish/poly about 10%
 
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