Damp wood from Home Depot....How long to dry it?


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Old 09-09-13, 02:55 PM
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Damp wood from Home Depot....How long to dry it?

Yesterday, I got a 4x6x8 and it was damp to the touch. It has a really pretty tree rings on the end sections, which is why I got it. I am going to make a headboard and use one inch slices of it, sand them, stain them and attach them to a sheet of plywood. Since I was going to cut it into one inch slices anyway (and since my bad back won't let me carry much weight) I had them cut it into 4 2' long pieces.

My question is: How long will it take for them to dry? I have had them leaning against a wall inside my house with a fat pointed right on them. They are now dry to the touch. Since they are so thick I'm pretty sure they are still moist inside.

Just in case you can't picture what shape the cuts will look like, the headboard will look like: [URL]http://www.home-designing.com/2012/07/unique-wall-texturing-examples/wood-block-headboard-wall[URL] OR [URL]http://www.luxuryhousingtrends.com/archive/category/uncategorized/page/2/[URL]
 
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Old 09-09-13, 03:40 PM
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Welcome to the forums! You probably bought pressure treated(decking) wood. It is treated with ACQ, which is made up of copper oxide and quanternary ammonium compound, which are both fungicides and insecticides. It is almost always wet with the treatment when you buy it. It may not be the best choice for making a headboard, since it can take up to 6 months for it to dry out when left in the open, probably much more inside.

Any wood you purchase that is adaptable for building furniture will almost always be kiln dried and ready to cut/turn/nail/screw, etc.
 
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Old 09-09-13, 04:07 PM
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So it'll take at least 6 months? Man, oh well.
 
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Old 09-10-13, 04:42 AM
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Also most PT woods don't take interior stain the same as white wood, staining the end grain can be even more challenging as it's more porous. Sanding the exposed ends will help, otherwise the same stain on the end cuts will be a LOT darker than the same stain on the border rails even if the wood is the same.
 
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Old 09-10-13, 06:16 AM
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I'd also bet that when you slice it it's going to dry out an split like crazy.
 
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Old 09-10-13, 06:55 AM
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If you're going through with the project, you may as well cut the 1" slices now, it will dry much faster. You will probably have checks and cracks in several pieces. You're going to need a belt sander to sand down all that end grain.
 
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Old 09-10-13, 09:38 AM
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Yeah I have a belt sander. And I was thinking about cutting the slices but I am afraid of damaging the blade and the kick back.
 
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Old 09-10-13, 09:51 AM
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Well, how exactly were you going to make the headboard if you aren't going to cut the 1" pieces? Wet wood gets cut all the time. And what the heck were you going to use to cut it anyway? A band saw would be the best tool, you'd need a giant circular saw or a 12" table or radial arm saw to cut it otherwise.

Why not check around with a few real lumber yards or even a sawmill if you have any. They may have or can order kiln dried untreated wood of the size you need.
 
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Old 09-10-13, 10:24 AM
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"Well, how exactly were you going to make the headboard if you aren't going to cut the 1" pieces? Wet wood gets cut all the time. And what the heck were you going to use to cut it anyway? A band saw would be the best tool, you'd need a giant circular saw or a 12" table or radial arm saw to cut it otherwise.

Why not check around with a few real lumber yards or even a sawmill if you have any. They may have or can order kiln dried untreated wood of the size you need."

I am going to cut it...I said that earlier. I just heard wet wood makes the saw kick back. I also heard it will crack the wood when it dries. I have a 14" chop saw my dad is letting me use. Are you think length wise cuts? No, I'm slicing them so that they would be 1' thick 4"x6" tiles so it will show off the wood grain. Refer to the links of the pictures of similar headboards that I posted earlier. Well, I'm gonna test out what I have first but I have called a lumber yard earlier today to price untreated pieces just in case what I have doesn't work out.
 
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Old 09-10-13, 10:36 AM
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Kiln dried wood would be a big improvement over PT lumber! I'm a painter not a carpenter but I've never noticed any kick back issue with PT versus white wood. Wet wood may have more resistance but you should cut slower in those instances - let the saw do the work, don't force it to cut faster than it should.
 
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Old 09-10-13, 10:52 AM
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14" chop saw? Guess I never saw bigger miter saws than 12". Chop saws are usually an abrasive blade for cutting metal in my experience. Not really suitable for wood. Are you sure even a 14" will cut on one pass? I know a 12" will just barely cut a 4x4.
 
 

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