Joiner angled cuts issue

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Old 04-12-14, 07:08 AM
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Joiner angled cuts issue

Just obtained a Porter-Cable joiner ['97 professional model] that has a blade that is angled just enough that when joining two pieces of wood with the biscuit, the two cuts are angled too much and are unsightly/unusable.

Is there something that can be done with this tool?

The blade doesn't wobble, so I do not think it is bent and many people [I have asked] don't seem to be familiar enough with joiners to give recommendations. And I don't see any way to adjust the 'camber angle' of the blade.

Thanks
 
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Old 04-12-14, 08:15 AM
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Get your model# and go to an on-line parts service for a manual.
Your jointer most likely has jack-screws under blade for blade height adjustment.
TURN OFF POWER!
Follow instructions in manual. Or without manual, place a straight edge such as a framing square on top of a sheet of paper on out-feed table and adjust blade height to just 'tick' when passing by straight edge. Do this for both ends of blade and both blades. Tighten blade wedge and recheck. Once the proper adjustments are made, the jointer should be ready for service.

If I haven't explained it well enough, ask again. Maybe another poster can do a better explanation.

RR
 
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Old 04-12-14, 09:14 AM
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In my experiece, when people have trouble with a biscuit joiner it is often because they don't have the material clamped... or don't keep the joiner flat as they push in. but that doesn't rule out a bad bearing. All plate joiners should be adjustable as far as the angle itself.
 
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Old 04-12-14, 10:55 AM
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Now that I'm not on my phone, here's a better reply. Your model (providing the exact model number might help) probably has an adjustable fence, where the angle of the cut can be changed from 0 through 135, with an adjustable stop at 90. If it's not cutting into the wood at a 90 angle you might need to do a fine adjustment, and how to do that is described in your manual. With no model # we can't give you a link.

the two cuts are angled too much and are unsightly/unusable.
What do you mean by unsightly? ???

What we are picturing is probably a kerf cut that is at a slight angle, so that when you insert the biscuit fully, it sits at an angle (such as 3) and then doesn't fit into the opposite piece, which is also cut at that same 3 angle. Is that what you are trying to describe?
 
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Old 04-12-14, 11:18 AM
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Be certain your wood is laying off the table when you use the joiner. The joiner could possibly lift up if both the wood and joiner are flat on a table top. Both have to be in free air to have the proper spacing.
 
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Old 04-12-14, 07:17 PM
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This:

What we are picturing is probably a kerf cut that is at a slight angle, so that when you insert the biscuit fully, it sits at an angle (such as 3) and then doesn't fit into the opposite piece, which is also cut at that same 3 angle. Is that what you are trying to describe?

Yes, thanks for the responses. The angle is very slight but, when joined with a kerf cut at the same angle on the opposite piece makes for an 'ugly' joint. Using the plywood layers as a way to see the angle -- it can start [on the left side] in one ply and end in another ply [on the right side]. On several trial runs, I am getting consistent cuts that are angled.

The wood is clamped down and the joiner is on a level surface.

I will try to get a model number and a closeup picture.
 
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Old 04-12-14, 07:35 PM
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I think I am incorrectly picturing the angle of the cut and the tip of the blade tipping up or down as you plunge into the wood, but if I read you correctly, you are saying that after you finish the cut and you look at it, the long dimension is tipped left to right?

That almost sounds like the blade or the bearing is being torqued and is bending as the plunge cut is being made. Or maybe it's been permanently bent that way through use.

Does it do the same thing regardless of how fast or slow the plunge is made?
Have you checked to ensure the blade is installed correctly and is turning in the right direction?
Has the blade even been replaced? If it's used it could be a well used old blade that needs to be replaced.
Or it could be that the parts that hold the blade perpendicular are worn out. I know my old DW744 table saw motor has shifted to one side because of the pressure that is put on it from ripping boards. Something similar might have happened with your biscuit joiner.
 
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Old 04-12-14, 10:49 PM
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This is the best I could do to show the angle of the cuts. You have to REALLY look at the thickness of the ply to get the idea -- it is very slight but, when combined with the same cut on the opposing piece, is obvious. Slightly higher from left to right.

It is a model 556 and, I did not see this adjustment addressed in the manual.

Unfortunately, I do not know much about its history other than I was told it was used in a furniture shop. Took it apart as far as I could [at the time] but, did not see a way to get at the blade.

While I have been offsetting it with a shim, I would rather correct the tool -- if possible.
 
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Last edited by tpring; 04-12-14 at 11:08 PM.
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Old 04-13-14, 02:53 AM
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Are you using the drop down front plate? Can you adjust that so you get good cuts? Your slot is almost too close to the edge, leaving only one ply plus veneer. A cut more close to the middle may provide more stability.
 
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Old 04-13-14, 07:00 AM
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Does it do the same thing regardless of how fast or slow the plunge is made?
I would say that one of the parts inside it getting worn on one side (due to the pressure of pushing the blade into the work) so if it's something you can't live with, it looks like the blade spindle bearings and bearing retainers are still parts that are available.

The first thing I would suspect, though, is the plate above the blade, directly above the upper blade flange. I would suspect that through use and metal fatigue, that plate is no longer perfectly flat. It looks like it slides into that bottom piece and then there is a set screw that prevents it from sliding around. Those wings could probably pretty easily get bent just a little.
 
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Old 04-13-14, 10:14 AM
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Pic to show angle of cutting wheel.

Plunge slowly [new to this].

Blade/mount is slightly angled so that left side [in pic] is higher than right.

No attachments, pic above was only a practice cut.

Could worn brushes cause this or, only a decrease in power? Would rather not just start replacing parts and hoping it gets cured.

* Had typed up much more but, 'lost' it.

edit: unfortunately, my manual does not show an exploded diagram.
 
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Old 04-13-14, 01:58 PM
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Go to a website like toolpartsdirect.com or ereplacementparts.com and enter your model number then select the correct "type"... and examine the schematic, then perhaps you would understand a bit better. Brushes have nothing to do with this. I think you will see the plate that I referred to earlier that could possibly be stressed. If you're unwilling to take it apart and investigate, I don't know what else we can do for you.
 
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Old 04-14-14, 09:25 AM
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Excellent -- Thanks for those links. I was leery of taking it [apart] too far and not getting it back together but, now I can see the various parts and, know the names.
 
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