wall not flat (concave) - ? about lining up cabinets


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Old 11-02-14, 11:53 PM
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wall not flat (concave) - ? about lining up cabinets

So I have "U" shaped kitchen and the bottom of the "U" has a concave wall-in the middle of the run the wall sticks out farther than on the ends. So not having a straight edge to put across the entire run to see exactly where to start the run, I estimated. I have the 162", 7 cabinet run all lined up and leveled-used EZ level system so have two 3 cabinet runs and then one cabinet that goes between them so essentially 3 cabinet "units". all the cabinets are joined together except one joint. I have not yet attached the to the wall. But, where the "peak" of the concave wall is located, I guess I didn't quite get it right as there is a 5/16" gap between the back of cabinet and the wall-if I had gotten it exactly right it would be touching at this location. I didn't think this was issue and was just going to fasten them all to wall with shims. I assume the countertop measurer will just have counter go all the wall to the wall so it shouldn't matter that there is this gap. Is there any issue doing this? I would have to move all the cabinets back 5/16" hoping that they stay level. The 5/16" will not make any difference in the other legs of the "U" shape of cabinets.
 
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Old 11-03-14, 05:56 AM
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What type of countertop is going into the space? what type of backsplash are you installing? Is drywall on the wall or open studs? You can shim the cabinets, it is the counters that are of concern here.
 
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Old 11-03-14, 09:53 AM
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Yes, I know I can shim cabinets. The countertop is my concern. It is Silestone counter and backsplash. There is drywall on the wall. Unlike the corian that I have in bathroom, I believe that Silestone backsplash is installed in the field. I would think they just measure for countertop as usual, install countertop (against the wall) and then install backsplash hugging the wall as best as possible. Since material is not flexible, I would think that there will be gaps but the area where the wall sticks out the most the backsplash will be touching at that point.


The area where where the closer of the two small 9" cabinets is located (the clamp is on the 9" cabinet) is the area where the wall sticks out the farthest. The gap here is 5/16". So I could push all the cabinets back 5/16" to make this cabinet touch the wall and reduce the other gaps. But right now everything is level. The bottom of the cabinets is parallel with a seam in the hardwood floor.

Edit-5/16" is the max possible that the cabinets can go back. In reality, they may not be able to go that far back depending on how the wall sticks out in the area behind the cabinets. They may hit wall before 5/16"
 

Last edited by hammerash; 11-03-14 at 10:33 AM.
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Old 11-03-14, 02:09 PM
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Verify that the Silestone back splash is totally rigid and can not flex. If there is a little play in it then it will bend with the contour of the wall. Otherwise, it looks like you have one stud that is a little out. I would wait for the counter to arrive, score a line across the top of the back splash, pull it out and remove a section of drywall across that one stud area and lightly inset the back splash into the drywall. It will float in that one area, but will not affect the overall splashes appearance of function. the A bead of caulk will finish it off. You will probably be the only one who knows that the wall is off.
 
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Old 11-03-14, 03:30 PM
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Your Cabinets need to be "straight", which means all the faces are in a direct line and "flat" when a straight edge is applied to fronts.
Sounds like you understand this and have done your best job.

Here's the bad news. You cannot control the wall. The stone can be adjusted as far as depth goes. They could make the counter 25-1/2 deep or 25-3/4 deep, no biggie.

The wall needs fixed. Stone Splash will not flex.

Easiest way would be to float wall above base cabinets before installing uppers and counter.

Hard way would be to remove drywall above base cabinets. Reinstall drywall using drywall shims at studs to make wall perfectly straight.

I would do one of the two and not leave wall as is. Post back for tips on either option.
 
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Old 11-03-14, 03:47 PM
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Easiest way would be to float wall above base cabinets before installing uppers and counter.
+1.

In fact, on most of the projects I work on, the backsplash would probably have been applied already, (as straight as the countertop guys could make it) and then the drywaller would come back and float the wall out to match the backsplash. No one would worry about any gaps behind the upper cabinets, as long as the end cabinets have end panels that are scribed to the wall tight.

BTW, that wall is convex, not concave. If there's another the room behind that wall, it would be concave.
 
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Old 11-03-14, 09:55 PM
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Yes, convex, sorry.

Well the area that sticks out is over a stud as mentioned above. 5/16" at that location. The rest is about 5/8" with one small area 13/16". So floating from 5/16" to 1/2" over the entire wall seems like a lot (for me). I think going to remove drywall from between one stud to left and one to right from the one that sticks out too far, between the top of base and to about mid height of wall cabs. Above that point, the wall seems to be pretty flat. So I think going to cut out that drywall, see what I can do about the firring that is behind drywall, and put in different thickness of drywall. Then finish cabinets, get countertops and float this area and the small area that was 13/16" (the low spot). Regarding firring, this house was built 1900 and has balloon framing, rough cut true 2x4 studs. I had to fir the wall to match a post I had to put in and I did the best I could using 4' level. Should have used something longer but didn't have.
 
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Old 11-04-14, 06:15 AM
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Should have used something longer but didn't have.
Use a chalk line or mason's string, touching the stud that sticks out in the middle, but wrapped around a nail that will hold the string out however far you need on each end.

If it's only one stud, it would be pretty easy to remove that one stud and replace it with a straight one. If the sill plate is crooked, and the wall is also that crooked at the base of the wall, then that's pretty tough to fix, and the only "perfect" solution would be to fir the whole rest of the wall out.

You could also plane the bow out of the stud if it's not sticking out from floor to ceiling... or you could also do the trick 45 cut - about 3/4 of the way through the center of the stud- and then drive a framing nail through the wedge to drive both pieces together again. That's another way to reduce the center bow from an offending stud when it's not practical to remove it entirely.
 
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Old 11-04-14, 07:51 AM
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It does not appear to stick out the entire wall. I put an 8' straight edge across wall mid wall cabinet height and it appears flat there. But at top of base cabinets, it shows the bow. As mentioned, there is firring on the studs so I can remove some of that. Or just put 1/4" drywall across this area, have countertop installed and then float the area above splash.
 
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Old 11-05-14, 11:18 AM
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Ok, I took the plunge



Here you can see the bow in the wall
 
 

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