Need help with carousel Horse Repair


  #1  
Old 12-15-14, 01:58 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: ny
Posts: 81
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Need help with carousel Horse Repair

Hi Everyone,

Not sure if this is the correct forum for my questions but it was the closest I could find. Here's the situation. I'm repairing a carousel horse that fell off it's stand and the two front legs broke off. The legs broke off right around the knee area. One broke at the original glue & dowel joint the other didn't brake at the orig glue joint but split in a longer vertical break which actually made the repair easier because there was more area to glue to and the mating surfaced fit together perfectly. I have already glued the legs back on but have a couple questions regarding doweling and filling an area with a missing section. The leg that broke at the orig glue joint also had a 3/8 x 4 dowel in the joint that broke, too. I want to replace the dowel but have never done this so here are my questions. As I said, the leg is already glued back in place and the orig dowel was positioned at the kneecap and went in a diagonal direction into the center of the thigh. My plan is to install a new dowel as close as possible to the original dowel. The orig dowel is still in place, so I know where to start the hole and I also know the angle of the orig dowel. So I will try to keep it as close to that ass I can. I will be using a hand drill to so this. What size drill should I use for a 3/8 dowel? What wood should the dowel be made of. (the horse is basswood) Should the dowel be grooved or spiraled? Should I put in more that one dowel (it only had one originally). Is there anything else that I should know before I start this. The other question I have is about a missing chunk of wood (1" x 2") on the back of lower leg (see photos). I don't have the piece so I will either have to make the piece or use a wood filler. What would be best and what should I use. Any and all advice and or suggestions are appreciated. thanks much mross
 
Attached Images     
  #2  
Old 12-15-14, 03:19 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Likes: 0
Received 9 Likes on 8 Posts
What a beauty! If the original dowel was broken, why not drill through the same hole at the same angle and insert a new dowel? Changing locations may make for an uglier spot to fill in. Use a 3/8 bit for the 3/8" dowel. Dowels are made of a softer wood, so they will swell when glue is applied. Having the pieces put together will make it a little more difficult, but the dowel will be necessary for rigidity. Epoxy wood filler will take the place of the missing piece handily, but getting it to take the stain, I'll have to defer to Marksr, our paint guru for that. If you were painting, it wouldn't matter too much. He'll be along shortly.
 
  #3  
Old 12-15-14, 05:16 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 153
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
This may be the wrong way to do it, but if I were doing it I'd probably go up to a 5/16" dowel, and rig up some kind of jig around the leg so that you can use a guide on the drill to maintain angle and make sure the new hole is concentric to the old.

Seems like drilling out the 3/8 again will leave a hole that's already cured glue on its inner surface, and I don't know if that'd be better or worse for bonding in the replacement dowel.

Again, I might be completely on the wrong track with this idea, so please someone speak up if I am.
 
  #4  
Old 12-15-14, 05:51 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Likes: 0
Received 9 Likes on 8 Posts
You have a valid point. It will depend entirely on how big the original dowel was.
 
  #5  
Old 12-15-14, 06:07 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: ny
Posts: 81
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
chandler,

thanks for your reply.

You stated: "Having the pieces put together will make it a little more difficult, but the dowel will be necessary for rigidity"

I was thinking the exact opposite, in regard to gluing the leg on first and then installing the dowel. I felt it would have been nearly impossible to remove the old dowel completely without enlarging or modifying the hole and therefore ending up with a poorly fitting dowel. By gluing the leg on first, and then hand drilling a 3/8 dowel hole as close as possible to the original, I don't have to worry about having an enlarged hole or a poorly fitting dowel. The only issue that could happen is that I'm off slightly on the drill angle and the new dowel will be positioned a few degrees different from the original, which I don't see as a problem. I also don't have the worry about the dowel holes lining up perfectly, as I'm drilling just one hole through both pieces at the same time, so even if I'm off slightly on drill angle, the dowel will fit perfectly. Where am I going wrong? mross
 
  #6  
Old 12-15-14, 06:17 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Likes: 0
Received 9 Likes on 8 Posts
No wrong. Rock 'n Roll..........
 
  #7  
Old 12-16-14, 03:35 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,335
Received 702 Likes on 619 Posts
Epoxy wood filler will take the place of the missing piece handily, but getting it to take the stain,
Fillers never take stain like wood does often you have to resort to some faux painting to make a sizable repair made with any type of filler to blend in.
 
  #8  
Old 12-16-14, 05:49 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 4,946
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Will this horse be painted?

I don't understand what is happening with the dowel. You already glued it back together. Are you going to drill a hole from the outside to put a new dowel in? And then have a hole you need to fill?
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: