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Hanging Cabinets on Metal Studs with 2 x 8 wood blocking -

Hanging Cabinets on Metal Studs with 2 x 8 wood blocking -


  #1  
Old 07-27-15, 12:20 PM
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Question Hanging Cabinets on Metal Studs with 2 x 8 wood blocking -

Hi all,

I am installing Ikea kitchen cabinets on metal studs (3.5" , 20 gauge studs) with 2 x 8 wood blocking between the studs for the upper cabinets. Lower base cabinets - just metal studs / sheetrock. Also, the studs are spaced from 12" on center to 24" on center, if that makes any difference. I cannot add studs as this is a condo and the wall is shared by a neighbor.

For those unfamiliar, Ikea cabinets are installed by hanging a metal rail first and hanging the cabinets from the rail. (like a French cleat)

I would appreciate if people can weigh in on what type of screw(s) to use for each of the three different sets of materials I am utilizing to attach the rail / cabinets (listed below in detail)

1. The Uppers thru Metal Stud and blocking

(Screw to attach Ikea Metal Rail and Metal clip to the sheetrock, go thru 1/2" Sheetrock, thru the 20 gauge steel stud and thru the 2 x 8 wood blocking behind the stud);

2. The Uppers - thru Blocking only

(Screw to attach the Metal Rail and metal clip to the sheetrock, go thru the 1/2" Sheetrock and thru the 2 x 8 wood blocking); and

3. The Lowers - Thru Metal Stud, no blocking

(Screw to attach the Metal Rail and metal clip to the sheetrock, go thru the sheetrock and thru the 20 gauge steel stud only - no blocking on the lowers - don't need it b/c most weight on the feet of the cabinet)

Thank you for your help.

Joule
 
  #2  
Old 07-27-15, 12:42 PM
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Fine threaded screws are meant for metal, like your studs. Coarse threaded screws are meant for wood, which would be your blocking. Since the blocking is really the structure, I'd go coarse threaded whenever you're hitting that, regardless of whether through a stud first.
 
  #3  
Old 07-27-15, 01:23 PM
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I agree but if I understand correctly the base cabinets will be secured to metal studs only which should have the the fine thread screws although I don't think it would make a big difference as it doesn't take a lot to hold the base cabinets in place especially if there are several attached together.
 
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Old 07-27-15, 01:26 PM
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Sorry if I was not clear but I did mean to say coarse threaded screws for the bottom cabinets.
 
  #5  
Old 07-27-15, 03:33 PM
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Is it possible to fabricate some kind of stand/toekick to support the majority of the weight of the lower cabinets? That would allow you to probably just use Teks Screws to mount the lower rail into the steel studs to keep everything stationary against the wall.

Is the 2x8 blocking run horizontal between the studs in the area for the upper rail? If so you should be able to just use almost any kind of structural screws with fairly close spacing attaching the rail through the drywall into the blocking.
 
  #6  
Old 07-27-15, 10:14 PM
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Stickshift and Marksr, The blocking is the structure only on the upper wall cabinets, running horizontal between the studs where the uppers will be installed. I do not have blocking in the walls for the base cabinets. Unfortunately, I made the mistake of not doing my research (cabinets on metal studs) before putting up the sheetrock. After reading lots of posts online and staring at my walls for many days, I could not in good conscience hang the cabinets on the metal studs without adding the blocking. So, the rock was removed at the top of the walls and the blocking was installed for the uppers. I didn't think the expense was necessary for the base cabinets as the weight of the cabinets and counter will be on the floor, not the walls. The base cabinet rails are there to help make the installation easier for the average person and to help with leveling the cabinets. There won't be nearly as much weight on them as the wall cabinets. Therefore, the base cabinets will be attached to the metal studs when I can and with snaptoggles for the sheetrock.

I agree that the screws used for the uppers which have metal studs and wood blocking, should be more focused on catching the wood than the metal, however, I was hoping there was a screw that worked for both. I realize now that the wood blocking is the controlling factor when we are talking about the uppers.

For the uppers, I have purchased a few types of screw - (a) SPAX Unidrive, flat head, multi-material construction Screws, #8 and #10, 2 1/2" long, (b) GRK R4 Multi Purpose Screws #9 and #10 by 2 1/2" with the star drive head.

Both of these work for lots of materials, however they both seem to be more focused more on the wood. Does anyone have a preference, and if so, why?
 

Last edited by joule1; 07-27-15 at 10:46 PM.
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Old 07-27-15, 10:28 PM
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I apologize that my posts seem to be all over the place. I thought I had to reply to each post and that my reply would be attached to the post I was replying to. Apparently, it doesn't work that way.
 
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Old 07-27-15, 10:45 PM
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Bmgreene, the weight of the base cabinets will be on the floor / legs / or other custom toekick wood base that I might build. The rail for the lower cabinets is there to make installation easier for the average person and is more for balance than anything. The lower cabinets will not be hanging from the rail. I can use Tek screws for the lower cabinets, however they are self tapping and I have read that self tapping screws might rip up the metal stud when using them. Have you had that experience?

Also, it doesn't seem that I can get 2" Tek screws in less the #12, which seems to be a bit thick. Do you think #12 is too thick for 20 gauge metal studs?
 
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Old 07-28-15, 04:09 AM
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I use these screws. They will grab the metal just fine. As you alluded, the weight is vertical, anyway. If you want, you can always do minor surgery for the base cabinets as well and install blocking if it gives you a warm and fuzzy. It will be hidden when the cabinets are installed. Using regular screws is not recommended in cabinet installation, unless you use convoluted washers. Use these. GRK Fasteners #8 x 2-1/2 in. Low Profile Washer-Head Cabinet Screw (100 per Pack)-113079 - The Home Depot
 
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Old 07-28-15, 06:47 AM
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I saw those screws in the store but was concerned that the top part of the screw did not have threading and once screwed into the wall the smooth section would sit inside the metal stud. (Rail and Clip thickness is 2/16" + 1/2" sheetrock is a total thickness of 5/8" of material before hitting the metal. However, after reading the posts here, maybe that doesn't matter because the idea of the blocking is to catch the wood for the wall cabinets. Is that right?

Also, what is the reason for portion of the screw that does not have threading?

As for the base cabinets, I don't anticipate doing any more surgery on the walls but will see how all this plays out today when I install the rails.
 
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Old 07-28-15, 02:12 PM
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The unthreaded portion allows the screw to turn free after it penetrates the body of the cabinet, thereby pulling the screw tighter to the wall without pushing the cabinet backwards. Similar theory of trying to bolt two threaded steel plates together tightly. You can't do it. Only when one of the plates has a smooth bore and the threaded plate is used to pull it all together do you get a tight fit.
 
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Old 07-28-15, 05:13 PM
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I knew there had to be a reason for that smooth section on the screw. Thank you for explaining it to me. With my setup, that smooth section doesn't come into play as the screws going into the wall don't pass thru the cabinet at all. The hardware that hooks up to the rail are metal and are bolted in from the two back upper corners of the cabinet. I bought a box of those GRK Fasteners you suggested earlier but never got a chance to try them out as my drill broke today when I was installing the lower rails. It's always something. Any suggestions for a new drill / driver?

Julie
 
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Old 07-28-15, 07:27 PM
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Aah, tool time. We can help there, too!! It really depends on how much you use the tools whether to go battery or electric. I use Makita impact drivers all day long, so batteries don't tend to go south on me from sitting idle. Homeowners will find it beneficial to use corded tools if they use them infrequently. A bit part of picking out a tool is how it feels in your hands. I have had some drills with badly designed handles that I just couldn't hold for long periods of time. On site feel tests are the best. Name brands like Milwaukee, Makita, Dewalt, etc. are excellent choices in both battery and corded.
 
 

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