Wainscoting and fluted moldings


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Old 01-12-16, 12:04 PM
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Wainscoting and fluted moldings

I would like to put raised or flat panel wainscoting on my main floor (2 rooms and a hallway)

All the windows and doors already have fluted moldings that I like a lot (I made myself a number of years ago). Just fluted moldings with plain rosettes.

But I dont see how to incorporate these fluted moldings into the larger job of wainscoting.

Do the stiles just but up against the moldings? The moldings are 3/4 inch thick. Should there be a difference in depth of these two components? It seems like it would look nicer.

I like the idea of a 1/4" plywood base glued to the sheetrock for the wainscoting to make it nice and clean (and give me better places to nail all of the wood to)

If I did that, would I use 1/2" thickness for all rails and stiles--and panel if I decide on raised? Although I guess if I put a raised panel in each section, there isnt much sheetrock to worry about.

Doing this would give me the same 3/4" as the window and door casings.

Or should the wainscoting protrude more so that the windows and doors are slightly recessed.
 
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Old 01-12-16, 12:19 PM
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Maybe others can wrap there heads around this with your description but I know I could benefit if you could post a couple pics.
 
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Old 01-12-16, 12:34 PM
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If you don't mind a shaker style of wainscotting, I would use 1/2" (or plane it down to 5/8") for the rails and stiles and then in the center, put your 1/4" panel. Rabbet out the inside perimeter of the rails and stiles to fit over the edges of your panel.

Or omit the panel completely if the drywall is in good shape and you plan on painting it all anyway.

Assemble all your pieces like a giant face frame... with a kreg jig and 1" screws. Glue the plywood (or omit plywood) into the rabbet from behind. Then fit the entire panel to the wall, nailing to the studs. Use construction adhesive as needed between studs.
 
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Old 01-12-16, 01:24 PM
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So you're saying the depth of the rails/stiles should be less than the depth of the window and door molding?
 
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Old 01-12-16, 02:19 PM
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I think it looks better if the rails/stiles are a little thinner than the molding, about an 1/8 inch or so. Second choice would be flush. I would not make the rails and stiles thicker than the molding; I think it would look funny, with the exception of a cap molding. If you are going to have cap molding over the top rail (like a bullnose that protrudes 1.5 inches or so, then I would lap that slightly (1/4 inch or so) over the window side trim so the return on the end of the molding dies into the window side trim.

The cap molding can be a nice look, sort of combines the wainscot look with a chair rail look.

There was an article in Journal of Light construction within the last couple of months about installing wainscot. IIRC, the author used MDF panels that have grooves in them to look like tongue and groove. And I think he used a cap molding as well. Anyway, you might want to look for the article.
 
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Old 01-13-16, 09:13 AM
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What you are saying is pretty much what I was thinking also. I just wasnt sure because it seemed like the rails/styles/panels might be too thin.

I will look for the article... thanks.
 
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Old 01-13-16, 02:14 PM
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2nd on the cap molding. It looks nice, especially with the returns into adjacent moldings.

There are several ways to insert the panels into the frames, X went over one way plus just eliminating them if possible.
Just wanted to say that nailing the full length 1/4" panel to the wall and then covering with your "face frame" is not the best way. You would be relying on the wall to be flat across the length.
Never happens on my jobs
 
 

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