Can you rip small increments with a router?


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Old 05-22-16, 04:52 PM
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Can you rip small increments with a router?

Lets say I have a piece that's 5-1/4 by 24 feet long, but I need it to be exactly 5 x 24. I don't have a table saw. I do have a jigsaw and I know I can clamp up the piece and work diligently with it, but I'm wondering about the potential of the router table? I'm a newbie and I dove right in and got myself a router and table and of course I haven't mastered it and don't know all of its full potential yet. I do already have a set of bits and a few of them are straight bits. Logically, I think that's the one to use, but I've only seen tutorials where they're used for grooves and dados. Just want to ask you guys if there is any reason I shouldn't use it on the edge of such a long piece?
 
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Old 05-22-16, 05:07 PM
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You won't be using a router table for a 24' long board, so that's out. If you are only taking 1/4" off why not use a circular saw and a rip guide?
 
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Old 05-22-16, 05:18 PM
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A 24' board is a bit unusual but yes you can trim it to 5" on a router table if your table has a fence or if you can clamp a straight edge as a fence. However, that's a pretty clumsy way of doing it. If you have a circular saw with a rip guide it would be a lot easier.
 
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Old 05-22-16, 05:43 PM
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Goodness, does it change your guys' opinions if I said it was 24 inches? Don't know why I said feet. LOL! The board is 2 feet by 5.25 inches. I need to shave off .25 inches.
 
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Old 05-22-16, 06:11 PM
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You can trim with the router in the table. In situations like yours though, I prefer to hold the router and use a straightedge.
I like the bits like below for trimming solid wood or plywood.

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Old 05-23-16, 05:37 AM
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1/4 is a pretty big bite to take out in one pass. I would do 2 or more passes about 1/8 each. Just be sure to keep piece moving or will get burn marks in wood.
 
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Old 05-23-16, 08:31 AM
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cwbuff, 24' on a router table without 3 able bodied persons to keep it true would be impossible. However, we now have clarification that it was embellished a little and was only 24", so doable.

I agree with Don, small passes make for better edges. Keep in mind, also to push the work against the rotation of the bit. This rotation will oppose itself if the router is in a table mount versus handheld.
 
 

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