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Installing heavy-duty pull-up bar to wall with Metal studs behind it

Installing heavy-duty pull-up bar to wall with Metal studs behind it


  #1  
Old 12-02-16, 09:23 PM
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Installing heavy-duty pull-up bar to wall with Metal studs behind it

Hello,

I want to install a heavy-duty pull-up bar (like one of these two: https://www.amazon.com/Xtreme-Monkey...=xtreme+monkey & https://www.studbarpullup.com/stud-bar-photos/) to a wall in my condo. But my building was built with metal/steel studs behind the drywall.

I have talked to some people who know a lot more than I do about carpentry who said that because the studs are non-weight bearing, it would be unsafe to install (and use) the bar in this situation, even with toggle bolts.

However, one of the manufacturers of the above products told me that with toggle bolts, the installation to drywall/metal studs is just as (if not more) sturdy than wood studs. He said that the non-weight bearing metal studs are still attached to the ground and above and therefore with several toggle anchors that he said can each hold 200 pounds, it would be rock solid.

I don't know what to make of the conflicting advice. I really want to install it but I really don't want to damage my walls (or myself) when using the bar. Any opinions here?

Thank you!
 
  #2  
Old 12-03-16, 03:00 AM
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Certainly you can attach the pull bar to a non-load bearing wall with some caveats. After all, kitchen cabinets are routinely attached to non-load bearing walls. My suggestion, though is to put up 2X6s (or maybe even 2X8s) horizontally across at least 2 studs (preferably 3) and attach the pull bar to them. Another option is to put up a piece of OSB sheathing first. These options will allow the stress to be spread over several studs.

Here's the caveats I mentioned:
1. You don't provide your weight but I assume it's average.
2. Although the studs will support the weight, the real issue is the torque caused by your jerking motion as you lift and lower. The studs will be fine if you do as I suggested but keep an eye out for cracks in the drywall.
 

Last edited by Tony P.; 12-03-16 at 03:27 AM.
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Old 12-03-16, 03:28 AM
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I would probably go a different route and mount it to the ceiling joist system. They should be wood, unless it is concrete. Is that an option?
 
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Old 12-03-16, 05:21 AM
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Here's a link to the strongest anchor I've used, they're rated for 300# in all directions:

WingIts World's Strongest Fastener Standard (6-Anchors)-RC-MAW35-6 - The Home Depot

The 300# is in drywall, if you drill through the face of the metal stud, the anchors should be plenty strong enough.
You should also purchase the required industrial 3/4" bit for installation, which is about $10.
 
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Old 12-03-16, 08:24 AM
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@handyone: Thank you for the input!

If you look at my first link, the bar requires a total of 16 bolts into the wall. The bar in the second link requires 8. Would you use the anchors you linked for all 16 (or 8) bolts into the wall? Or in the case of the first bar, for example, are the top bolts the ones bearing the brunt of the torque? Do you think either of the two bars would be easier/safer to install and/or safely use based on their design?

Thanks again.
 

Last edited by yoself; 12-03-16 at 08:43 AM.
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Old 12-03-16, 08:27 AM
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@chandler: Thank you. I have concrete ceilings and they are twelve feet off the ground, so the bar would be higher than I'd like--plus concrete installation would be more complicated than wood. Still an outside possibility that I had considered before, but not ideal for my situation.
 
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Old 12-03-16, 08:35 AM
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@Tony P.: Thank you. First, you're right, I weight 170 pound.

Your suggestions are along the lines of the folks who told me offline that I shouldn't install the bar directly to the wall. I'd like to avoid adding wood to the exterior of the wall, mostly for appearances, unless necessary. But nice to know that is an option. What do you think of handyone's suggestion? I don't mean to pit people against each other... I just would feel more confident if experts were able to reach agreement on this issue Thanks again.
 
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Old 12-03-16, 10:45 AM
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Since the weight is being spread out over the surface of the wall..... Handyones suggestion will work but because it's a metal studded wall..... in my opinion..... the sheetrock is likely to crack as the metal studs will allow the wall to flex.
 
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Old 12-03-16, 10:56 AM
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I have a better idea I think than original.

Run two 1 x 4's floor to ceiling, they can be plain or fancy. The 1 x 4's can be secured to the wall with anchors.
The anchors I linked to are max 1.25 wall thickness, but there are others.

With the combination of anchors and having the boards "wedged in", it's going nowhere.
You can then attach the bar to the wood posts using screws.
 
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Old 12-03-16, 05:52 PM
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At his private suggestion, I'll compound on Brian's comments. Take 2x6 lumber that will reach from floor to ceiling and lay it flat on the wall directly over a stud and fasten it to the stud using a good method such as toggle bolts in several places. THEN on the ceiling, take a piece of 2x6, say 8" long and lay it flat on the ceiling and fasten it there using either power actuated pins or Tapcon screws. This will keep the 2x6 from tilting away from the wall and you can mount your bar on the 2x6's.
Don't laugh at my drawing.

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  #11  
Old 12-04-16, 06:05 AM
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Overall, my preference is for any solution that spreads the stress over a larger area than the products provide. Keep in mind that, while weight is an issue, the most important factor will be the repetitive stress you'll be placing on the wall going up and coming down.
 
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Old 12-04-16, 08:47 AM
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I agree with Tony P
Think about using the two upright legs as discussed, and adding a panel behind those.
It's the best of both worlds.
 
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Old 12-04-16, 08:21 PM
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Thanks so much, everybody, for your advice. I've come to believe that the amount of modifications I'd have to make (not to mention the unsightliness of the modifications in my guest bedroom) may just not be worth it for me.

Another idea I have is placing a bar like this in an out-of-the-way area of a hallway: https://www.amazon.com/Doorway-Pull-...%2Bpullup&th=1 I prefer that to placing it under a doorway because the top of the doorway can interfere with my motion. But the doorway has wood trim, the hallway has the same metal studs that the rest of my home has.

I am thinking that since the weight will be pulling directly down where the bar is pushing against the wall (instead of out like the original bars I posted would), it would be a safer solution with much less stress on the walls--even though not exactly what I wanted. Am I correct?

Thoughts on installing this one? I do not yet know whether the metal studs on the opposing walls of the hallway match up with one another. Would I need to anchor wood on the wall of the hallway to be safe?

Thanks again.
 
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Old 12-05-16, 02:21 AM
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I just replaced a bathroom door and frame for a client because her son used one of the pressure type chin up bars in the frame. He kept expanding it when it wanted to slip to the point that the door frame came apart and split. I'm not a fan of these after seeing the damage it can cause.
 
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Old 12-05-16, 04:47 AM
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Just my opinion, but I suggest sticking with your original approach with structural support as we suggested. Perhaps you can paint the wood or even add trim to make it blend in with the room's style / décor.

The doorway location could work but you run the risk of splitting trim.

One last thought: what about a free standing unit?
 
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Old 12-06-16, 08:27 AM
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I'm considering free standing units. They're not exactly what I want, but one may be what I end up with.

Going back to someone's initial alterntive suggestion. What about hanging a bar from my concrete 11.5' ceilings? It seems as if the bar would hang down to about 8.25' if installed directly to the ceiling, which height may be doable for me (I am 6' tall). What would that installation entail? Would jumping up a bit to reach the bar cause too much stress on it? I weigh 170 pounds.
 
  #17  
Old 12-07-16, 05:01 AM
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Thickness of the concrete varies by age of the building and code. Older buildings are likely 4", less for newer ones - so make certain what you're dealing with. My same statement applies to the ceiling: spread the weight.

Beyond that, be careful you don't hit a plumbing / discharge line or (even worse) electrical lines.

Tony P.
 
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Old 12-07-16, 06:04 PM
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I don't think the upright supports with a panel behind it would look any worse than a door, and some doors look nice.

Just a joke but you could always do what the Navy Seals do, carry a telephone pole around everywhere you go.
 
 

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