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Replacing laminate sheeting on small counter on basment utility sink

Replacing laminate sheeting on small counter on basment utility sink


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Old 04-06-18, 11:28 PM
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Replacing laminate sheeting on small counter on basment utility sink

Hi.

I've got the laminate sheeting and next week want to attempt and replace the laminate sheeting on it that's from the 70's or maybe later.

I was watching a video on YT and think I can do it. I'd like to do as best a job as I can , but it doesn't have to be perfect since it's a basement utility type sink, etc.

Anyways, he took off the old and used a small sander to clean up the wood and then cleaned it.

Can I cut the laminate with a circular saw and a 60 tooth blade, maybe put on backwards?

He used a router to clean up the excess that he had purposely overlapped on the edges. I realize this would most likely give a very "professional" look, but I don't have a router and don't really want to buy one just for this. Can I use a file or something on the edges instead?

Heck .... maybe I should just by a cheap router?

Thanks
 
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Old 04-07-18, 04:32 AM
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Don't put blade on backward. Over cut laminate about a inch all around. Be sure blade is spinning before it starts a cut. I posted a small router in your other post that should work. If you plan on other obs that need a router I would look at other types for a more universal type.
Don't forget to use the stick under the laminate as you install as as soon as it touches it will stick.
 
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Old 04-07-18, 05:58 AM
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Yes, a file can be used to trim the edges of the laminate sheet. Even when using a router to trim I like to leave the last little bit to be hand filed as I can get it totally flush. Or, you can angle the file and put a bevel on the edge.
 
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Old 04-07-18, 08:57 PM
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I take it you have not yet discovered laminate's score & snap abilities? This is the easiest way to cut it. and if your are careful it works well. As you know, you will want to trim it to size when it is on the hoof. A file will work, as will a belt sander. A surform file is good. Don't go afgainst the grain though. It will be a lot of work but you will get an exquisite edge. Finish up with fine sandpaper. There are many ways to skin a cat.
 
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Old 04-08-18, 08:25 PM
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Originally Posted by richard123vmt
I take it you have not yet discovered laminate's score & snap abilities? This is the easiest way to cut it. and if your are careful it works well. As you know, you will want to trim it to size when it is on the hoof. A file will work, as will a belt sander. A surform file is good. Don't go afgainst the grain though. It will be a lot of work but you will get an exquisite edge. Finish up with fine sandpaper. There are many ways to skin a cat.
It's in the basement so the edge is not that critical, although I'd like to get a descent look on the edge. So are you saying that I don't have to go out and buy a router? I'd rather not, if I can just score and cut it and then use a file to finish the edges?

Thanks!
 
 

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