Would a particle board door of this width hold?

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Old 02-11-19, 02:41 PM
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Question Would a particle board door of this width hold?

Hello,

These forums are HUGE, so I'm not sure if I posted in the correct subsection. Please move it in case there's a better fit.

I am planning on making two closet doors, which are a little wider than normal. The whole space is 1500mm (60") wide, so one door would be 750mm. The height of a door would be 1800mm (70").

These doors are not something fancy, just a less visible closet door made out of particle board (not sure if that is the proper English term, LDF, chipboard). I want to create a frame for them out of something solid, which will be firmly screwed into the walls around it, and then a couple of hinges in this frame to hold these LDF panels as doors.

I asked someone more knowledgeable and he said that it won't hold, because they would be too wide, and the door would just rip off the hinges or bend under its weight. I am not sure about this however, I'm pretty sure I saw doors like this working just fine.

What do you think? Would it hold? Are there any special tricks to achieve something decent?

Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 02-11-19, 03:15 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

I wouldn't make the doors out of particle board [sawdust/glue] or OSB [wood chips/glue] PB falls apart if it gets wet and screw holes are notorious for wallowing out.
 
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Old 02-11-19, 03:59 PM
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LDF=MDF... which is medium density fiberboard.

You could make two 30" doors out of MDF, but how well they work will depend on the type of hinges you use. A face mounted hinge (barn style) would probably work okay, but you certainly would not want to put a hinge onto the 3/4" thick edge of the panel.

But we don't know for sure what you mean. You mentioned 3 completely different things.

MDF is fiberboard
Particle board is a pressed/glued sawdust board
OSB is a pressed/glued wafer or oriented strand board.

Of those 3, MDF would probably be the best choice if you are wanting to make a cheap closet door and it would paint up the best out of the 3.
 
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Old 02-11-19, 11:23 PM
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I don't understand, how is LowDF can be the same as MediumDF? In these places there is a clear distinction between the two, MDF being the more expensive one and also the heavier. I got my terms from wikipedia: Particle board.

Honestly I am not even sure what other options I have, as everyone uses particle board for these kind of things, except mine would be slightly wider.

Finishing might not even be that important, as these boards are already pre-painted. And it's not an important part of the house.
 
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Old 02-12-19, 04:18 AM
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Ah, ok. LDF is another name for particle board... my mistake. Thanks for the link. That word is not used here.

Having carried sheets of both, i can tell you that particle board is not much lighter than mdf... if at all! I still would never use LDF.
 
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Old 02-12-19, 06:35 AM
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Yeah, I don't know which one is the common term for this. What do you call LDF in the layman's terms?

What else would you use if you'd make a door like this?
 
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Old 02-12-19, 07:18 AM
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Particle board.

I think most people would just buy 30" door slabs and cut them down rather than reinventing the wheel.
 
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