Molding Around Close Openings


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Old 03-06-19, 09:28 PM
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Molding Around Close Openings

I've got 2 SH windows with a 5" gap between them created by 1" of drywall (returns) and I'm assuming (2) 1.5" studs. I'd like to install wood casing/trim around them. I haven't picked out the casing/trim yet.

When one has windows this close together (I also have this issue with a window and a sliding glass door) how to they typically trim out the openings? I would think two 2.25" trim pieces back to back (for each opening) would look odd. Using a flat piece of stock to bridge the gap I think would look plain.

Tried the google but in this instance can't the keywords correct to bring up what I am looking for.
 
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Old 03-06-19, 09:32 PM
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If it is wide enough for 2 pieces of casing to fit back to back... with a little space between, you case each window seperately.

If it isn't, you case both windows as if they were one and you use a 1/4 thick mull cap between them.

Btw, .5+1.5+1.5+.5 = 4". Must be another inch in there somewhere if it's really 5".
 
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Old 03-06-19, 10:16 PM
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Remeasured and it's actually 5.5", (3) 1.5 + 1" drywall.

So even if it leave a little 1/4" or 1/8" gap you would do it separately? Have any quick links to pics?

Found another post where you talk about mull cap as lattice. Found this

https://www.lowes.com/pd/E16-Painted...-ft/1000801720

Not sure how it is used. Let say the gap be be bridged is 4"? Are you saying you would trim the exterior of the two windows as if they are one (Top trim running from top left of one window to top right of other) and then use a piece like this to bridge the gap in the middle (cut to size for appropriate reveal)?
 
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Old 03-07-19, 05:24 AM
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Lattice is <1/4" thick. The piece you linked to is 11/16". You would need to plane it down on a thickness planer if you were going to do that... doubt you will be able to find and buy anything that wide, so your options are limited. Lattice isn't usually available much wider than 3". 5 1/2" is pretty wide to be used as a mull cap anyway. This is the closest that a store would sell, and it's not a stock item. It's special order. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Alexandr...0RLC/100648677 And it will warp unless you glue it to the wall with construction adhesive and nail the edges.

I'd case them separately. You'd have about 1 1/4" between them. That's perfectly normal, not "odd" at all.

Yes, that's how it's done. You case the top as if they were one... and either case the bottom or install a stool as if they were one. The inside edge thickness of casing is 1/4" or less... the thickness of the mull cap needs to be 1/4" or less.
 
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Old 03-07-19, 09:16 AM
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You could remove the drywall in between the windows and then use a 1x6 to span the gap. That's pretty much how the double windows in my bed rm are done.
 
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Old 03-07-19, 09:21 AM
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You'd have about 1 1/4" between them.
4.5" (Framing)+1.5" (.75" Ext jam)-4.5" (2.25" Casing) - Reveal = 1 1/4"

Is this sort of how you came to that number?

If so, that limits me to 2.25" casing. Is that considered standard? I haven't looked at casings yet at the lumber store.
 
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Old 03-07-19, 09:28 AM
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use a 1x6 to span the gap
This is kinda what I thought XSleeper was originally talking about with the mull cap (since corrected). My only concern would be how a flat piece of stock would look sitting there (maybe they have nice milled pieces?). Again, for some reason my keywords into google aren't bringing back the pictures I'm looking for. Maybe I'll go down to HD and see if they have pictures I can reference.

I'm not for or against anyway, just would like to see it before I put it up.
 
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Old 03-07-19, 11:18 AM
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I can't get over why you think this is unusual. If you are removing the drywall and corner bead, then yes, you can lay a 1x6 on the framing as the mull cap. You will want to air seal the joints between each 2x4 though, otherwise you will get mold from air passing through the gaps.

You mentioned 2 1/4" casing in your first post. Thought that is what you were using. Next standard size is 3 1/4." You would not have room to put 3 1/4" casing back to back unless you ripped them and glued them together back to back. That would certainly complicate your miters a little.
 
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Old 03-07-19, 11:40 AM
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seal the joints between each 2x4 though, otherwise you will get mold
Thanks for the tip!

Not so much unusual, just I haven't been exposed to this and am looking for pics to give me a view of it. I'm good with it, just would like to see it prior to the install.

Re: Molding size, I threw that size as that is what was common on the BB sites. Not sure what standard was (but you answered that). I think I'll go purchase a couple of samples of both to see if the 3 1/4" is too big (Probably).
 
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Old 03-07-19, 11:50 AM
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https://www.google.com/search?q=wind...bih=1493&dpr=1

Click on the first picture, then click on see more like this.
 
 

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