Interior window apron?


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Old 04-15-19, 09:33 AM
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Interior window apron?

I read the most common way to make an apron is to flip a piece of casing upside down, cut to the exact width of the outside of both side casings, cut at a 45 and then cut a small 45 as a return. I'm a bit confused about the return part..

Is the return supposed to lay flush with the upside down casing or is it supposed to be cut in a manner where it lifts the casing off the wall?? I hope that made sense. I have attached pictures.

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Last edited by PJmax; 04-15-19 at 10:09 PM. Reason: cropped/resized pictures
  #2  
Old 04-15-19, 09:46 AM
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If it moves the apron off the wall, your return is too long. The return should be a triangle when viewed end on.

Are you using a miter saw? Those cuts look rough!
 
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Old 04-15-19, 10:11 AM
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Ok, I thought it looked wrong.

Yeah, I am using a miter saw but I prob need to change the blade because it is chipping at the edges.
 
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Old 04-15-19, 01:12 PM
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I'm seriously starting to feel like an idiot at this point.

As simple as this sounds, I can't figure out how to cut the returns so I am obviously doing something wrong.

Anyway somebody could point me to a drawing that better explains the exact cuts need to be made as I'm coming up empty handed. I must have cut 25 pieces already.
 
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Old 04-15-19, 01:23 PM
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Both the ends of main piece and the little return pieces are cut at 45
 
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Old 04-15-19, 01:45 PM
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Are both ends of each return cut at a 45? or is one side just a straight cut?
 
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Old 04-15-19, 01:50 PM
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The end of the apron is cut at a 45, the little return is cut at a 45 [opposite direction] the 2 pieces put together makes a 90 angle.

I've painted hundreds of windows where the carpenter would skip the return and just nip a little of the edge off at a 60 angle. IMO that looks almost as good and better than a poorly done return. But if you have to match existing windows ..........
 
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Old 04-15-19, 03:19 PM
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is one side just a straight cut?
The side of the small return that touches the wall is a straight cut.
 
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Old 04-15-19, 03:43 PM
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Let's assume you can stand the casing up with its back against the fence.... fat side up, just like it's going to be on the wall. Start with a piece that is plenty long with square cuts on both ends. On the right end cut a 45 right. (Miter saw is swung to the right.) Then on the left end cut a 45 left. Then set the saw back to zero... and cut off those pieces carefully so that they are a PERFECT TRIANGLE. (When looking down on the casing from above) Put a pencil line on the top edge with a square so you can see which side of the line you want to leave. Those tiny pieces are your returns. The right one is your left return and the left one is your right return.

Then cut your apron to length. Stand it up the same way. 45 right on the right. 45 left on the left. Then glue on your returns and use tape to clamp them until the glue dries.
 
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Old 04-15-19, 07:43 PM
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Ok , I got it. The detailed explanations really helped!

Xsleeper, when you say "Then glue on your returns and use tape to clamp them until the glue dries." Do you mean just use tape to hold on the return? I am having a hell of a time trying to get the damn things to stay perfectly lined up.

What do you think about the suggestion marksr made about just nipping a little of the edge off at a 60 angle? There are no other windows that I am trying to match.
 
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Old 04-15-19, 07:52 PM
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I have seen that done... (it's 10 or 15 degree angle) it's very amateur... the whole point is so that the profile wraps around the sides.

Yes, you use the tape to hold the return while the glue dries. Take a 6" long piece of masking tape and put half of it lengthwise on the back and fold the rest around the end of the return... then while you are pushing the return into the glue tightly you wrap the rest of the tape over the front. Do that twice for each return. Once on the top half, once on the bottom half.

If they don't mate perfectly, it's your crappy miter saw blade. Finish work calls for a finish blade... and a decent miter saw that doesn't wobble.

Once your a pro you can also shoot the apron on first, then tap your perfectly cut and glued returns on and it will usually hold without clamping. The glue will sometimes cause the return to warp. You can limit that by sparingly gluing the apron ends first, and then push the dry returns into the glue. They seems to curl less that way.
 
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Old 04-15-19, 07:58 PM
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Ok, got it. I will give this another go tomorrow. It's 10 pm here and my neighbors are prob about to kill me for running the saw so late.
 
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Old 04-16-19, 05:44 AM
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One of the best uses for a 23 gauge pin gun is pinning on small returns. But with thin casing, a guy often skips the nails and just uses glue. Those returns break fairly easily.
 
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Old 04-16-19, 07:41 AM
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I worked behind one carpenter that would just leave the returns setting on the stool and then I'd caulk them in place. That worked out better for both of us, me because I didn't have to fix a botched up job. I used caulk in place of glue and then also caulked the perimeter - they stayed in place.
 
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Old 04-17-19, 08:32 AM
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marksr, that's not a bad idea but as small a job as it may be, I didn't want to throw any extra work at my painters.

Def not perfect, but hopefully the painter will work his magic with the calk and paint. That damn glue gets everywhere.

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Last edited by PJmax; 04-29-19 at 09:06 PM. Reason: resized picture
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Old 04-17-19, 08:38 AM
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Looks good, IMO it's easier to attach the ends after the apron is nailed up.
 
 

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