Install chin up bar in hallway

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Old 09-25-19, 08:01 AM
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Install chin up bar in hallway

I'm looking to install a chin up bar in a hallway entrance that is framed in with steel studs. It's going to be one of these types: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07123SKTV that screws into each side of the wall. If I use toggle bolts into the steel frame, is that going to be strong enough and is the wall going to be able to support my weight? I'm about 220.
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Old 09-25-19, 08:58 AM
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That bar is intended to be installed in a door frame where there is usually more structure.

Common metal studs are used to hold up drywall, not meant to be a structural component.

You might be able to span a couple of studs on each side with a board and then hang but I would be concerned trying to do this just between walls with metal studs!
 
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Old 09-25-19, 09:59 AM
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I would be really careful mounting anything of weight on steel studs. The chin up bar I wouldn't attempt.
As mentioned, they are ok for holding drywall up, that is about it.
 
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Old 09-25-19, 10:05 AM
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I want to mount it where there is an entrance to a hallway (where the red line is) which looks like it's framed in with steel studs and would be stronger? That's what I wasn't sure of. I can't put it in one of the actual doorways because I'm too tall.

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Old 09-25-19, 10:33 AM
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You are screwing into thin metal so the screws will not hold very well.

Only thing I can think of that would work is to screw a 2X4 to each wall.
They would have to extend all the way to the floor.
You would have to put a spacer behind the 2X4 at each screw or remove the base boards.
I would space the screws every 12 inches.
Then the chin-up bar would sit atop these.
A lot of fixing if you ever want to move the bar.

Do you not have an unfinished utility room that you could hang it from the floor joists.
 
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Old 09-25-19, 10:55 AM
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No, it's an apartment, and I don't have a lot of room otherwise I'd get a freestanding chin up bar. This is the only area that looked like a possibility, but don't want to do it if I'm going to risk it breaking on me.
 
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Old 09-25-19, 11:48 AM
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If that is indeed steel studs, you are sadly out of luck.
Have you by any chance run a test hole (small drill bit) to see if it is indeed steel or wood?
 
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Old 09-25-19, 11:50 AM
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Spread the load!

I would consider going into the Door Header (top portion) When you come from the top you, you are distributing the load evenly over the top of the 2 side Jambs (supports) versus drilling into the sheet metal Thus weakening the jambs! I would consider getting some longer self tapping bolts and try and come up with a simple hanging solid attachment. Or Maybe even perhaps considering large eye bolts? In which the bar can slide into? Just my .02 cents ps. I weigh 195
I have always tried to find two adjacent door 90 degrees to each other and always installed my chin up bar over the two headers! I have always felt safer than between the jambs! ( although I must say the one you are considering sure looks solid!)
PS Manden has a very good alternative.
Thinking along those lines, you could also consider a couple of strong short gussets (I would laminate a few pieces of 3/4 plywood, followed by many self threading sheet metal screws, again spreading the load) securely attached to the jambs with two holes large enough to allow for your bar.
Good Luck Please let us know what you came up with.
 
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Old 09-25-19, 12:30 PM
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I drilled the wall, it's definitely steel on the other side
 
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