Best method to build floor mirror frame

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Old 10-14-19, 01:07 PM
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Best method to build floor mirror frame

I have a heavy 67" x 26" slab of mirror from when I was a kid. It's just a slab of mirror with no frame that I've always just leaned up against the wall. I'd really like to make a floor standing frame for it but most of the tutorials I've looked at were either to in-depth or in my opinion not structurally sound.

Can someone point me to a simple effective esthetically pleasing tutorial? I basically just want it to look like one of those IKEA floor mirrors with the thick trim.

I would like it to look like the picture below.

 

Last edited by rufunky; 10-14-19 at 02:13 PM.
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Old 10-14-19, 01:52 PM
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If you can find a photo that represents the look you are going for that would help tremendously.
 
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Old 10-14-19, 02:12 PM
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Edited the original post and added a picture
 
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Old 10-14-19, 03:48 PM
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Get 5/4" stock and rabbet / dado the back side out to receive the mirror. Paint the rabbetted area black so that the raw edge doesn't reflect in the mirror. You might also want to opt to use butt joints (rail and stile) rather than miter joints. Join them with pocket screws and glue.

Use a little mirror adhesive to adhere the mirror to the frame. It should fit with about 1/16" to spare on each side. The dado perimeter should be about 3/4" wide.

Then either shoot the trim to the wall studs or use d-rings on each side to hang it like a picture.
 
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Old 10-15-19, 08:22 AM
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Thanks xsleeper. I never used a dado, is it just a blade that connects to a standard table saw?
 
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Old 10-15-19, 09:13 AM
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Yes but you would need a dado throat plate. You can also just make a 1/4" x 3/4" rabbet with the table saw by running it through twice.
 
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Old 10-15-19, 09:24 AM
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A lot depends on what tools you have at your disposal, it's also possible to build up the frame using some 3/4 pine/rough then playing on a second piece of 1/4" pine/luan/molding on the back to capture the mirror.

If it's really big you might even want to put a backer across the entire mirror/frame to provide greater support!
 
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Old 10-15-19, 09:46 AM
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You said "floor standing" do you want it to be able to stand on the floor by itself?

If yes then you will need a thick base and probably have to add lots of weight at the base so the mirror is stable.
You do not want a 5 1/2 foot mirror falling on you.
 
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Old 10-20-19, 04:16 PM
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Arrow

Sorry for the late response. I got busy and had to postpone the project.

I went the route Xsleeper suggested and made a 1/4" x 3/4" rabbet with the table saw by running it through twice. It worked out great except for the fact that I ran the rabbet from the top to the bottom of each board forgetting I planned on pocket screwing the separate boards together :/ .

Keeping in mind I can no longer pocket screw the boards together, what is the best method for joining the pieces together as well as holding the mirror in place?

I was thinking of just taking another 2 pieces of 1x4 and screw and glue one across the bottom and one across the top.
 
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Old 10-20-19, 07:33 PM
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Glue a piece of wood that fits tightly into the dado and clamp it for a few hours then glue and pocket screw it.
 
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Old 10-24-19, 04:52 PM
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Thanks, Xsleeper. I glued pieces of wood that fit into the dado. worked out great. I had little metal brackets laying around that I used to hold the mirror in so That I can take it out when I am ready to stain.
 
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Old 10-24-19, 04:57 PM
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So far so good!
 
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Old 10-27-19, 06:21 PM
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Question

I bought some stain to try on a scrap piece. Is this what the stain should look like? I mean with all of the light spots?
 
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Old 10-27-19, 06:30 PM
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Not every species of wood stains up beautifully. Poplar and pine are ones that don't always turn out nice, especially with dark colors. It's the contrast between the soft fast growing early wood and the harder slower growing late wood that creates the contrast in the woodgrain. You can't do much about it unless you just leave the stain dry on the wood like paint. That doesn't always look good either and it can create adhesion problems with the finish.

A project that's going to be stained starts out with picking the right species of wood for the look you want.

​​​​​
 
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Old 10-27-19, 06:50 PM
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Got it.

Well, I wasn't looking to spend a ton on this so the weathered look will do. Thanks for the information. Now I know for future projects to test the wood with the stain to be sure its what I'm looking for before the build.

Would you recommend a finish coat after the stain? If so do you have any recommendations?
 
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Old 10-27-19, 07:00 PM
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Definitely. I usually spray all my finishes with a gun, I haven't brushed anything in ages. For a little project like that I wouldn't be afraid to use a few rattle cans of spray lacquer. Lacquer is very easy to use and forgiving, as long as you avoid spraying it too heavy. You don't want runs. Lay it flat, spray lightly. Rub it with a green scotch Brite pad between coats and give it as many coats as you like. Each coat melts into the previous one until you have a nice thick finish. You can get it in various sheens... I prefer satin, which is the lowest gloss.

As far as your stain is concerned, you could try a second coat of stain and see if it helps.
 
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Old 10-28-19, 06:34 PM
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So I decided to sand the whole thing with 100 grit to try to get the stain to stick, used a brush instead of a sponge and instead of wiping with a rag I wiped with a brush to give it more of a grain look .

I think the results are exactly what I was looking for. I will finish with spray lacquer most likely this weekend.

Let me know what you think.
 
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Old 10-28-19, 06:38 PM
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Looks like you should have just used paint. You basically painted it with the wiping stain. As long as you like it I suppose that's all that matters.
 
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Old 10-28-19, 07:03 PM
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Right, not sure if you can tell in the picture but the grain still pokes through. Would I have got that with paint too?
 
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Old 10-28-19, 07:56 PM
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You would only see the woodgrain if you thin the paint so that it's more like a wash.

I had a friend that did some experimenting by mixing paint dyes into acrylic poly. It turned out kind of cool.... hard to describe, it was translucent- like a tinted poly- but with bold colors... blues, reds... It was a long time ago, I forget exactly, but it looked pretty awesome.
 
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Old 10-29-19, 08:41 AM
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That sounds interesting. I have been watching a lot of woodworking videos and wood- burning techniques. I was almost tempted to burn the grain before the stain.

I'll save that adventure for another day lol

PS. now that the stain soaked in, it looks less like paint. I don't know if that will change once I lacquer it. I'll post a pic when its complete.
 
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Old 10-29-19, 10:13 AM
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Looks great!!!
I think it will look even better once you lacquer it.

With softer woods I usually use a sealer before staining.
It tones down the grain and also gets rid of planer marks etc.
 
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Old 11-03-19, 09:07 AM
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So it's the weekend and I was going to spray lacquer the frame. I'm just now realizing it's fall and we're probably not going to get 65 to 70 weather again until spring. I don't have a garage but I do have a basement work area. I also have stuff down there that I don't want lacquer on like a washer and dryer my security camera stuff etc. Any suggestions?
 
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Old 11-03-19, 11:32 AM
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Put rosin paper or newspapers on the floor and put Painters plastic up to make a spray booth around your work area. There is no reason to use fans, they just blow the dust and overspray around.
 
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Old 11-03-19, 01:49 PM
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Got it, thank you. How many coats should I do of the lacquer?
 
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Old 11-03-19, 03:26 PM
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As many as you like. It all depends on how thick of a coat you spray each time. Generally it will be at least three. Rub between coats with a Scotch Brite pad.
 
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Old 11-04-19, 02:39 PM
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I ended up putting on about 3 coats..1 can.

It gave it a nice smooth finish. Made it a little darker but I'm ok with that because it was a toss up between black and charcoal grey.

When the light hits it you can see the grain but from afar, it does look painted.

Thank you for all the help.
 
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