Planing wood

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Old 03-21-20, 11:27 AM
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Planing wood

I have some old 1" thick pine subfloor that I want to plane and reuse.
I only have a table top planer (mastercraft) and not sure if I should rent something more heavy duty. The wood has a lot of dust and rough surface on it and I need to do about 50 10' boards.
Think it will work?
Wood https://imgur.com/gallery/j0karPa
 
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Old 03-21-20, 11:53 AM
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Would need a model number to know what size and type of planer it is. And are you taking it down to 3/4 so that it's perfectly smooth or what?
 
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Old 03-21-20, 12:30 PM
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This is the closest:
https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/m..._wcB#store=200

Wood is 10" wide so most of the planer.
Would like to take it down to 3/4 so 1/8 off each side
 
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Old 03-21-20, 12:38 PM
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Well, it might work, but it will be very slow going, if it works at all, and be aware that if there is ANY dirt on the wood or in the rough depressions of the wood, it will destroy your blade. If you rent a planer, you will ruin their blade and they will likely charge you for it. It's usually smart to have spare blades and if you need a perfect finish, put them on for your final pass. Wood coming out of a planer needs to be finish sanded anyway. But a bad knife on the planer can scar the wood, and even sanding wont fix it.

10" is pretty wide to send through a plane, you will have trouble with it not wanting to feed, and you will only be able to take maybe 1/32" per pass, if that. Waxing the base of the planer with paste wax will help the wood slide.

If you could, I would suggest ripping those pieces in half on a table saw so that they are only 5" wide. It will help tremendously. A more powerful planer, like the Dewalt dw745 would likely be a better choice. Planing 50 boards, 1/32" at a time will take a while. And if the planer gives you fits, you will give up after your 2nd board.
 
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Old 03-21-20, 12:42 PM
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I really wanted to keep them at 10" wide. Was planning a few different uses for them, steps (2 glued together to be 1.5") , table top, wall panel, etc.
 
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Old 03-21-20, 02:13 PM
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For all the effort its going to take call around to some mill houses and see what they will charge, your going to need a pretty good size tool to do what your looking at!
 
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Old 03-22-20, 02:46 AM
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You also want to be doubly sure there are no nails hidden in the wood as they will nick the blades.
 
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