Cabinstairs

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Old 07-07-20, 03:21 PM
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Cabinstairs

After many months (nearly a year) I finally had the stairs put in at the cabin. Looks like they were always there. Boy those Amish are so detailed. Things that I would consider OK does not pass muster with my guy. Fantastic job. Now all I have to do is lightly sand the rails to prevent slivers and stain the stairs to match the cabin. Maybe put a heavy coat of urethane on the rails to make them feel smooth. I was expecting the cost to be about $400 to $500. He only charged me $250. I paid him $300.
Next spring we are going to rebuild the foundation. He's done this type of work before so I'm all in.

Since the angle of the stairs is not standard, it was decided to leave the backs open to allow one's foot to completely contact the tread.
 
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Old 07-07-20, 03:53 PM
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What about the 4" rule regarding spindles spacing?
 
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Old 07-07-20, 05:36 PM
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Glad your happy but as mentioned it's not going met any modern building codes.
 
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Old 07-08-20, 02:17 AM
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I'd poly all the wood, at least 2 coats. The wood will stay clean looking longer that way.
 
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Old 07-08-20, 03:44 AM
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Out there in woods codes be damned for the most part. I bought the cabin from the code enforcer officer. I'll may call him and have him take look. I think he'll get a kick out of it. When I first told him I was working with Johnny (the Amish guy) he said don't worry about anything, just go with whatever he suggest.

Got a point about the poly on everything. May do that.
 
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Old 07-08-20, 07:14 AM
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I'd be interested to see the top part. Does that beam crossing right-to-left continue over the stair? How much clearance there for headroom?
 
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Old 07-08-20, 09:08 AM
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Norm - A good looking set of stairs appropriate for your cabin, building code be damned. I just finished rebuilding a set of guardrails and a stair rail in my house. Are you aware of the ladies handbag rule? I wasn't. I think you flunked that one too. Another stupid rule written by people that have nothing better to do than annoy us. Just reading the rules for stairs and rails will drive you bat **** crazy. Here's a typical example discussing railings (I think) - "When the total perimeter of the sides exceeds 6 inches, a graspable finger recess complying with section R315.2 must be provided on both sides of the handrail. There are no dimensional provisions for newels."
 
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Old 07-08-20, 01:20 PM
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2john02458 said
I'd be interested to see the top part. Does that beam crossing right-to-left continue over the stair? How much clearance there for headroom?
The cross beam just misses an average size person by about an inch. But best practice is to duck slightly .
That was a consideration when designing the angle. If it was "code" specifications it would've come out along the floor by about another 2 feet. We did not want that. We considered a two landing / right angle stair, but that would've taken up even more room. This particular design still leaves the "living" room open and with the open backs you can see through them. A spiral stair case was costly and not practical.

Here are some pics of the whole "hunters" cabin. (I'm bragging and showing off at this point.)
The first pics shows the turret section from the outside.
Second pics shows climbing up the original ladder to reach second landing and entry to the turret section. That's the Missus while Son #1 is below.
Third pic shows the second landing inside the turret. The upper or third turret will be smaller and only one bunk.

This cabin is about 35 to 40 years old and was abandoned for the past 20 years or so with no maintenance. At this point we caught it just in time it give it remedial action before it's too late. Our next big project and expense is to redo the foundation. Basically it's caved in. That means removal of both decks, front and back. But they're in bad shape anyway. That expense to replace decks will be up to my son.









 
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Old 07-08-20, 01:47 PM
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Your wife is a lot braver than my wife! Mine would never climb a ladder past the 2nd rung.

Nice cabin but if I had your cabin and your house ..... I'd never be home, city life just ain't for me.
 
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Old 07-08-20, 02:32 PM
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When things get more settled I'll spend more time out there.

Just a humorous side note. As a kid I had no problems using an out house. But as I'm older and have a few minor problems at the exhaust end (if you get my meaning) I prefer to use full bathroom facilities with clean walls and floors and running water. I've also become a bit squeamish about bugs and especially spiders.

Never was before. But spiders, if inside the home, and I don't mix. Outside I have no problem. Inside I feel trapped. Stupid I know and all in my head.

But when you have a few beers within an hour and nature calls you can only argue with her up to point. Well yesterday that point came. Hell or high water, bugs, spider or what not, I used that out house and never looked back. I feel sorry for any spiders that had to endure the process.
 
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Old 07-08-20, 05:13 PM
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Marksr - My wife is the same way. She can stand at the edge of a 2000' drop and say take my picture but she freaks out 2 steps up on a ladder.
 
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Old 07-08-20, 05:22 PM
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Norm - We had an outhouse at our deer camp ( a lot more primitive than your place) when I was a kid. It was always a contest in the cold NovemberAM to see who would be the first to use it to warm up the seat.

A side note - visiting one of the fine historic mansions in Charleston a few years back we toured a 10 hole outhouse (no dividers) made of brick with marble finishings. Sort of "the family that ****s together . . . . " WSe saw the same thing in Europe.

I grew up on a farm that had a two holer but we also had indoor plumbing and the outhouse was only used in emergencies.
 
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Old 07-08-20, 05:30 PM
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As kid at our camp site at a place called ZOAR Valley here in Western New York we had a two seater. It sat at the very edge of the gulley. We used ash and lime as a "disinfectant". Never bothered me back then. Fun times. Again no running water, no electric (or generator), no phone.
Stuck a drain pipe in the creek nearby and dug a hole to fit a 5 gal bucket under it, That was our water. But as kids it took us many years to learn not to bring the dog with us. He would go upstream and dirty the water. We would bring back the water to camp and Dad would say you got it, you drink it. And we did.
 
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Old 07-09-20, 02:19 AM
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I've heard my wife say they always had running water when she was a kid - it was just a matter of how far you had to run to go get it.

If it wasn't for digging the hole I'd put an outhouse behind the barn. That way I wouldn't get fussed at for tracking in dirt when I have to go in a hurry and can't take the time to remove my boots
 
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