DIY Dust Collection

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Old 10-12-20, 04:49 PM
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DIY Dust Collection

I have a small (very small) shop in my basement consisting primarily of a table saw and router table (which share a table top) and would like to hookup a DIY dust collection system. I bought a shop vac with 140 CFM of flow, which I understand isn't very much, but would like to at least give it a try. I planned on using a 5 gallon bucket and one of those HD cyclone lids, and building a collection box underneath the table saw and router table. I want to minimize any losses to ensure I achieve the greatest suction. I was thinking of installing an 8ft section of PVC along the wall and tapping off three points with blast gates and flexible 2-1/2" hose (the third port for general vacuuming or a tabletop extractor). I'll also have a Jet AFS-1000b air filter in the room. Does this sound like a decent setup for occasional woodworking? Is 4" pipe a good size to use along the wall? When building the collection box under the table saw and router table, should I put a divider between the two? In other words it would be one large box with an air tight divider and each side would have its own port.
 
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Old 10-12-20, 06:24 PM
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Your shop vacuum may work. I like that you are using the cyclone. Will help keep the filter clean. My first shop I used a shop vacuum without cyclone and filter would clog everyday. You are going to loose a lot of suction around blast gates. Try to keep them to a minimum.
With my new shop I bought a more pro type and am taking the bags off and putting separator on top of a 30 gallon trash can. Will be trying to automate the system that will open gate and turn dust collector on when I turn what ever use a machine.
 
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Old 10-13-20, 11:46 AM
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I have a Delta 1.5 HP single stage dust collector, so I cannot answer your questions about how well a shop vac would work.

However other than the collector itself, I have DIYed my entire system and you may be able to use similar solutions.

Although PVC is an option I used MDF to build 6" X 6" mainlines and 4" metal duct for connectors between mainlines on each side of the shop. The flat sides of the mainlines allow me to build my own blast gates from coffee cans and sheet metal.

Here are some pictures of the table saw and router collection boxes. I also have a sanding wheel, sanding table, drill press, bandsaw, planer, and lathe on this system. The machine area is 8' X 24'--a lot in a small area.



Left: Enclosed bottom of saw stand (with connection to dust collection system not shown.) Right: Collection box for router. Both have drop-down doors in front. Note that most of heavier particles from saw are not transported to dust collector. (I do not have a cyclone and this acts as one.)

Router table has additional collection point built-into fence as well as at collection box around the router below. Sheet metal gate for router is open with gate propped above connection box on the end of the mainline. That box can be removed to connect portable devices to the system. In the distance, the gate for the saw (next to the ear protection) is also open. The flap there hinges down and slides under the mainline to close the gate as the flex duct slides back. Beyond the ear protection the small gray hose collects dust from the top of the saw table especially when using a sled that blocks the opening around the blade to the area below the table top.

Hopefully this will give you some ideas.
 
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Old 10-13-20, 04:30 PM
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Does this sound like a decent setup for occasional woodworking?
Its all about air flow, the more you have the better the system will work.

Similar item, blast cabinet, originally had a big bag filter, just took up too much space but cleaned very well. Now I use a big shop vac (2 1/2" hose) works ok but can put the vac away when done!
 
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Old 10-13-20, 06:20 PM
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A shop vac works very well as long as you have a cyclone separator. While the can separator works fine with dust collectors I would highly recommend checking out the dust deputy. I had one and it worked wonders keeping the vac filter clean.

If you are using a shop vac, I would recommend using something smaller than 4" pipe. The vac will lose a lot of draw in a 4" pipe. Also, use long sweep 90's or double 45's when making bends.
 
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Old 10-14-20, 07:41 PM
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Curious how you cut anything longer than a couple feet with your table saw up against a wall like that?
 
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Old 10-14-20, 08:53 PM
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I planned on getting the dust stopper from HD. Or do you recommend the Oneida cyclone?
 
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Old 10-15-20, 07:45 AM
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Curious how you cut anything longer than a couple feet with your table saw up against a wall like that?
The saw is on wheels. The "wall" behind it is a wood rack that is 30" deep. If I pull the saw out about a foot there is space behind the saw for cuts about 3.5 feet long to extend under the wood rack above. The extension tables on each side can swing down. If I need to cut long pieces I swing the router table down and turn the saw counterclockwise 90 degrees. I can then cut 8 foot long (not more than about 4 feet wide) pieces before hitting the wall behind the lathe table at the end. If I am cutting a 4 x 8 sheet (not often) I use a portable saw and saw horses in another part of the shop (basement) that I use for assembly, painting, etc.
 
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Old 10-15-20, 08:12 PM
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The saw is on wheels. The "wall" behind it is a wood rack that is 30" deep. If I pull the saw out about a foot there is space behind the saw for cuts about 3.5 feet long to extend under the wood rack above. The extension tables on each side can swing down. If I need to cut long pieces I swing the router table down and turn the saw counterclockwise 90 degrees. I can then cut 8 foot long (not more than about 4 feet wide) pieces before hitting the wall behind the lathe table at the end. If I am cutting a 4 x 8 sheet (not often) I use a portable saw and saw horses in another part of the shop (basement) that I use for assembly, painting, etc.
Nice. Sounds/looks like a really nice setup. Wish I had the space to do that. I'm tempted to cut into my rec room area and double my shop size
 
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Old 10-18-20, 07:21 PM
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I bought a shop vac with the highest CFM I could find (193) and ordered a couple bulkhead fittings for the dust collection boxes I'll be fabricating for underneath the table saw and router. The vac has a handle on the back, so I will be able to hang it on the wall to keep it stationary and somewhat out of the way. I guess I'll just switch the hose back and forth for the time being. I removed the standard filter and instead installed a bag filter which should theoretically increase flow.
 
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