Lag bolt/hanging a stud pullup bar

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Old 01-10-21, 11:09 AM
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Lag bolt/hanging a stud pullup bar

Hi:

Somewhat (I think?) complicated situation and need advice.

I'm trying to hang one of those stud pullup bars-- the kind that you usually drill into your wall stud with lag bolts. Basically a left and right bracket affixed into the studs with 3 3/8" lag bolts each, 48" apart, and a bar between. You can easily google to see.

I only have one wall where I can hang the brackets. When I went to drill holes for the lag bolts, it turns out my studs are only about an inch thick behind the drywall, then it hits the concrete outer wall of the basement. The 6 3/8" lag bolts that come with the kit have 2" of threading, and won't go in all the way.

Some people online have suggested that I could lay horizontal plywood panels over the drywall, but under the brackets. The benefit of this is that it would enable me to affix the plywood to the stud inbetween the brackets, giving extra bolts. The brackets are about 20" high, so I bought 4 1"x6"x50" pieces of wood, which when stacked on the wall are 24" high (4 pieces, 6" each).

The question is: on the center stud line, can I stack 2 lag bolts per 6" panel? That would mean I would be installing each bolt about 1.5" from the top and bottom of the panel. That would give approximately 2-3" inches (depending on actual height of the panel) between each 3/8" bolt. Is that too close?

Alternatively, would the six 3/8" bolts for the brackets, plus one per panel (4) on the center stud offer enough strength? That would be ten 3/8" lag bolts total, each driven into the stud about an inch.

I'm 240lbs and will do all sorts of swinging stuff off the bar, so it needs to be SECURE.

Thanks all!
 
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Old 01-10-21, 11:24 AM
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You likely have 1x2 or 1x4 strapping that is barely secured to the block, which is a very inferior way of attaching drywall over concrete. So I would say that its a very bad idea to try to secure anything to that, as it likely will not be able to withstand repeated yanking.

If you are dead set on this idea, I would say that you should affix an entire 4x8 sheet or two of 3/4 plywood to the wall. The plywood would sit on the floor so there would be no possible way for it to drop, and then your only concern would be the top pulling away. And if those sheets were tall enough to fasten to your sill plate (the framing on top of the concrete wall) it would be very secure.

But fastening to just the 1x2 strapping on the block is not a good idea.
 
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Old 01-10-21, 11:31 AM
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Yeah, so it had crossed my mind as well that the studs probably weren't affixed very well to the concrete behind it.

Based on what you said, I will probably end up getting a different one I can hang to the ceiling, on the studs under the floor above. Was just hoping to avoid doing that!
 
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Old 01-10-21, 11:40 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

On a furred out wall..... you cannot rely on fastening to the furring strips.

FOR DISCUSSION ONLY:
  • Pull-Up Bar Depth: 30 from mount
  • Width: Can be set on 16 stud centers or customized up to 48 between brackets
 
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Old 01-10-21, 01:05 PM
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Is the ceiling finished? Or can you see the floor joists?
 
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Old 01-10-21, 01:47 PM
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This is a basement. The ceiling is finished in the part I'd hang the bar off of. But, there's a different part of the basement where the ceiling is only partially finished and I can see the joists. The finished ceiling where I would hang the bar is directly below my home's entrance. I've already located two studs 48" apart, and a third one between, although somewhat offset. Could potentially be due to a staircase directly above? I can gin up a rough floor plan of the basement and the level above if it would help.

Side note-- re: the original question, had the studs been able to bear weight, what would have been the answer as far as the vertical separation distance between 3/8" lag bolts? I'm actually still curious about that answer.
 
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Old 01-10-21, 04:12 PM
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The bar I linked to uses four fasteners per side. You would use four lag bolts.
You would predrill the studs so that they didn't split.
 
 

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