countersink for bugle head screws?

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Old 01-24-21, 09:36 AM
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countersink for bugle head screws?

I have and use large boxes of bugle head screws. We all do. They are all kind of the same size. It has been that way more than 30 years. Is there a countersink bit available yet? All I find are conical. And, the same old choice; have to buy a whole set of different sizes to use The One until it's used up, then got (new) crap in drawer forever. Who wants to go buy a separate supply of flat head slot screwdriver wood screws? Then try to find a good flat screwdriver from 50 years ago. I don't go along with the NewPeople way of doing everything slipshod. Sometimes I get to make a quality project that matters. And, trying to mash even good screws in flush with the impact driver yields broken screws.
I hand ground my own bit once, now can't find it. They ought to be selling things this standard by now. Can someone tell me where to get some? I'd prefer one with microstop cage.
 
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Old 01-24-21, 10:59 AM
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Learn something new everyday. Never heard the term bugle head for a counter sunk screw. But I like it.
There are two main counter sink sizes. Six common angles, which are 60°, 82°, 90°, 100°, 110°, or 120°, with the two most common of those being 82° and 90°.
I find that the two most common serves me well and never had a real prom using either one.
 
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Old 01-24-21, 11:03 AM
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bugle head for a counter sunk screw
Bugle head has a curved edge like a drywall screw. Regular countersink screw has a flat edge along the angle.
 
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Old 01-24-21, 11:29 AM
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A standard countersink drill bit will work just fine for Bugle head screws. I use them all the time.
 
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Old 01-25-21, 06:29 AM
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Since bugle head screw are designed to be used with drywall installation, there is no need for champfering, hence no need for a countersink tool. What type of material and joint involved where bugle head screw is breaking?
 
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Old 01-25-21, 10:35 AM
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There aren't counter sinks for bugle head screws because those screws are not designed for counter sinking. The bugle shape is solely so the fastener can be run in flush without tearing the paper facing on sheetrock. There are flat head screws designed for counter sinking for which there are countersink bits available.

If you are having trouble breaking bugle head screws then you're likely using them for something they weren't designed for. Since they are designed for holding sheetrock strength isn't one of their main requirements, but being inexpensive is so they are often made of low grade steel and you can snap off the head when using them for other things. If you want to countersink sheetrock screws into wood then use whatever countersink bit you have on hand. You can even sorta countersink with a drill bit. Because a bugle head has a curved face no straight sided countersink bit will be perfect but any of them should get you close enough.

As for flat bladed screws... you've got some old stock there if they are flat bladed. A few months ago I went through the misc boxes and jars of fasteners I've collected and took almost all the flat bladed hardware to the recycling center. Square drive were OK while they were around. Torx drive screws is probably the latest and greatest and do work great but some manufacturers screwed-up when they gave different size screws different size Torx making finding the right size bit annoying. I find the most useful to be Philips head. Almost all screws in a size class use the same size bit and with an impact driver stripping out the heads is almost a thing of the past.
 
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Old 01-25-21, 12:34 PM
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So I can imagine the demise of slotted screws. They are a PITA.
But can you imagine the demise of the flat blade screw driver?
 
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Old 01-25-21, 09:32 PM
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Screw construction has become ubiquitous around here, going back to the 1980's when we started cutting off phillips screwdrivers and putting them in electric drills. The yellow bugle head screw gets used for everything. Yes it started with black drywall screws. Then the yellow ones showed up, and then long ones, too. I've seen framing, sheathing, decking, furniture, cabinets, furring strips, even pallets screwed together, you name it. Nails got sent to scrap. I agree they are low grade steel, but it is hard, even brittle. It will ruin a sawsall blade. Then yeah, the impact driver. My favorite was / is the square drive, it just works. 20 and even 40 pound boxes of screws, and they say "bugle head" right on the side of the box. I have used drillbits and regular csk bits, and yes they work kind of close enough. Chisel bits are pretty good, and easy to make a pocket. (newdays, I have to grind the outer skags off so they are like they used to be before they made them dysfunctional, so once I ground one similar to the bugle silhouette) Still, it seems like after 40 years there would be something called "bugle head countersink" hanging on the pegboard at the store, if there has to be six other common angles. I'd buy one. Somebody could make money on it. I was hoping someone here was going to say they exist? Now, I can kinda quit looking, it seems.
 
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Old 01-26-21, 05:32 AM
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A pilot or clearance hole usually is required before a countersink bit is used so the countersink is concentric to the hole unless you have a countersinking drill bit. Not sure how you accomplish this with a chisel bit. I am still looking for your response as to type of material and joint involved with your issue.
 
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Old 01-26-21, 06:25 AM
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Flat blade screwdrivers got a second life... as chisels, prying things, paint stirrers and occasionally as a small hammer.
 
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Old 01-26-21, 08:00 AM
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Flat blade screwdrivers got a second life... as chisels, prying things, paint stirrers and occasionally as a small hammer.
Nothing like the right tool for the right job!
 
 

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