Need help for vertical baseboard issue


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Old 09-23-21, 02:18 PM
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Need help for vertical baseboard issue

My husband and I are redoing our baseboards in our house. One of the sections is underneath our handrail that goes up the stairs. My husband cut the two pieces, but the one that goes up the stairs is a 50 degree angle and when you match it to the flat piece that has itself cut at a 45 degree angle, they don't match. The one that goes up the stairs is longer/larger than the other one. How can this be fixed? We are using trim that is like crown molding (third picture shows what it looks like installed on another section of our baseboard).




 

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09-23-21, 03:32 PM
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First, Marq is not quite correct.

There is no way to do that in 2 pieces which will look good.

The only way it can be done is to make a triangle shaped transition piece.

Lay a piece against the handrail cap above the stairs and draw a light pencil line on the wall. Then lay a piece against the handrail cap on the front side and draw a light pencil line along the bottom on the wall. Then take a tri-square or combination square and extend that front line around the side until it intersects the other pencil line. The point at which it intersects the other line will be where your triangle transition and your pieces above the stairs intersect. That angle made by the 2 pencil lines needs to be bisected.

So one side of that triangle transition will have a 45 on it, while the other side will simply be that bisected angle.

 
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Old 09-23-21, 03:23 PM
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First, the molding your installing is door casing, not base board, which is fine.

The pieces running under the "handrail" are going to have a compound angle at the corners.

Not only are you cutting the 50 degrees at the bottom but that 50 degrees also has to be cut at a 45 degree, it's a complex cut similar to cove moldings!

Tough to describe, here is a picture, maybe someone else has a better image!

 
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Old 09-23-21, 03:32 PM
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First, Marq is not quite correct.

There is no way to do that in 2 pieces which will look good.

The only way it can be done is to make a triangle shaped transition piece.

Lay a piece against the handrail cap above the stairs and draw a light pencil line on the wall. Then lay a piece against the handrail cap on the front side and draw a light pencil line along the bottom on the wall. Then take a tri-square or combination square and extend that front line around the side until it intersects the other pencil line. The point at which it intersects the other line will be where your triangle transition and your pieces above the stairs intersect. That angle made by the 2 pencil lines needs to be bisected.

So one side of that triangle transition will have a 45 on it, while the other side will simply be that bisected angle.

 
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Old 09-23-21, 04:37 PM
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Thanks for the help! My husband is tired from doing cuts and nailing them up today, so he'll see if he can make that transition piece work tomorrow. Once complete, I'll make sure to come back here and show the finished work.
 
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Old 09-24-21, 12:03 PM
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So here are the pictures taken of how it will look (we had to use three pieces because of the lines in the wood. If you try and do just one larger piece, it just doesn't work. Using this many, it doesn't look good at all.

Any other suggestions?


 
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Old 09-24-21, 12:16 PM
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It's a bit closer now. He's working on the angle of this piece more. It's still leaving a gap though. He thinks he's going to have to rip off the top piece again to fix it.


 
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Old 09-24-21, 12:24 PM
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The top of the front piece also needs to be trimmed slightly to fit up into the angle between the handrail cap and the wall since the side piece is tight to the cap.
 
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Old 09-24-21, 12:46 PM
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The piece on the left is far too short. And there are no pencil lines on the wall, so that advice I gave isn't helping you. And you might need to put a bevel on the top edge of that short piece in front.

It's a bad molding to use there in the first place. Far too thick for the size of the cap. A thin door stop would look better. No profile would make it easier.
 
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Old 09-24-21, 07:13 PM
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In case you think it's not possible, here it is:

The bottom of the transition piece has to be level, just like the front piece is level. That was the point of the pencil lines... to show you where the bottom edge of each piece should be. (No bevel is needed on the top of the front piece.) The left side of the transition piece is the bisected angle (half the angle) and the piece going up the stairs is the other half of that bisected angle. It also needs a compound backcut on it because it also runs into the miter on the front piece. More on top... nothing on bottom. You put the transition piece on it and trace the line on the back side in order to see exactly where you need to back cut it.






Making the transition is very simple. Take a piece about 12" long. (to keep your hand away from the blade) Cut a 45 on the right end of that 12" long piece to fit the 45 that is on the left side of your front piece. Then whatever your bisected angle is, (I used 19 degrees) set the saw to that miter, and cut that little triangle off the right side of that 12" long piece. It will be 0" long on the top edge, just like a triangle is. It will come to a point on top.


 
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Old 09-25-21, 06:44 AM
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@XSleeper: Pictures worth thousands of words. But it looks like yours is wide edge down and theirs is wide edge up. Yes? Same process but I'm just not seeing the desired result for their latest left-side photos. Looks like your example works for the original right-side view shown in OP first post but you are showing it left-side in your third photo.
 
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Old 09-25-21, 07:03 AM
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Nope. Wide edge up. All my mockup photos are for the left side, just like the pics in post 5 and 6, which is why I made a mockup of that side. (Side view, top view, bottom view, side view with cap.)

The photos in post 1 were from the opposite side, so that's why my drawing in post 3 is from that side. Then they switched to working on the opposite side.
 
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