Leveling Painted Wood


  #1  
Old 03-05-22, 08:42 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 239
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Leveling Painted Wood

Once upon a time, my old house had doors into the kitchen. Years ago the doors were removed and the jams are now covered with many layers of paint. During my kitchen remodel I decided to remove the door stops from the jams for a cleaner look.

The jams will be repainted, but what is the best method to level the paint - wood - paint surface? Removing/replacing and stripping the paint are not options. Sanding has been incredibly slow, even with 60 grit and a ROS. Would joint compound/drywall mud work here? Looking for that secret, light-bulb idea!

Thanks!

 
  #2  
Old 03-05-22, 09:07 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,254
Received 681 Votes on 602 Posts
I'd scrape it some and then apply the j/c, sand, prime and enamel.
 
  #3  
Old 03-05-22, 12:44 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 20,171
Received 1,166 Votes on 1,124 Posts
This is not going to be easy due to the grain in the wood - you might even want to skim the wood with joint compound as well. Otherwise, I would certainly be spending a lot of time sanding the mud to make this look seamless but maybe you're better at mudding than I am.
 
  #4  
Old 03-05-22, 02:39 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 9,510
Received 954 Votes on 866 Posts
Orbital sander with 60 grit paper!
 
  #5  
Old 03-05-22, 02:49 PM
2
Member
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: USA near Boston, MA
Posts: 1,922
Received 256 Votes on 221 Posts
Orbital sander with 60 grit paper!
Presumably for the first sanding before skim coating with joint compound. If after there would be no skim coat left with that grit.
 
  #6  
Old 03-05-22, 03:42 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 29,282
Received 1,534 Votes on 1,378 Posts
The op said in post #1 that he used 60 grit to try to smooth the paint. But if his "ROS" is a 1/4 sheet sander, that's the problem and is why he's not getting anywhere using it. A 5" round orbital sander is quite a bit more aggressive, and would work better. But please know that when sanding paint you should wear a respirator and then there is the problem of lead paint dust, which is why lead paint should really not be sanded and made airborne at all. That's why paint can labels warn you not to sand paint.
 
2john02458 voted this post useful.
  #7  
Old 03-06-22, 06:35 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 239
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes, I was using a Random Orbital Sander with 60 grit, shop vac attached. I hit it again yesterday to level it out a bit, but will finish with joint compound. I am quite certain the base layer or two of paint is lead.

Agree - wearing a respirator is a must.
 
  #8  
Old 03-06-22, 09:31 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,254
Received 681 Votes on 602 Posts
It's not advisable to sand into lead paint! A mask may protect you while doing the work but any dust that is left floating around can still be an issue.
 
  #9  
Old 03-06-22, 09:35 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 239
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Iím not sanding into lead paint. The first layer or two, of 7 or 8 layers, is lead.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: