Paint cracking in joints of sunroom trim


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Old 03-15-22, 04:23 PM
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Paint cracking in joints of sunroom trim

Hi all,

We had a screened deck converted to a four-season (mini-split heated/cooled) sunroom a couple of years back. We were pretty pleased with the results, but there are a few points we are finding didn't hold up as well as we had expected.

One of those points is the paintwork in the sunroom. Due to existing dimensions to which the windows were fitted, the trim selected (matching the rest of house) needed to be butted to the trim on adjacent windows. What is happening is that the paint in the seam or joint between the trim is cracking. We do keep the sunroom between 65-80 depending on season, though I'm certain the room is flexing some even beyond temperature changes, and some times the temperature falls outside of that range.

Before I slap on any more paint, I'd like to take some time to improve the joints between trim pieces a bit. It's almost too hard to caulk without creating some sort of groove between the two pieces. In fact, it needs some sanding before I paint it too, as the original paint job was a bit sloppy and some of the profile between pieces is not as crisp as I'd like it.

It is possible I'm trying to be too much of a perfectionist too, which I've been known to be when it comes to work in my home.

Any suggestions from the experts here?

Thanks in advance.



 

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03-15-22, 04:52 PM
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Even maintaining the temp the humidity is probably not being controlled, thus the wood is swelling in the summer and shrinking in the winter.

The only think you can do is caulk the joints, preferably in the winter when the gaps are the largest!
 
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Old 03-15-22, 04:52 PM
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Even maintaining the temp the humidity is probably not being controlled, thus the wood is swelling in the summer and shrinking in the winter.

The only think you can do is caulk the joints, preferably in the winter when the gaps are the largest!
 
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  #3  
Old 03-15-22, 05:33 PM
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I do not think you will get a calk to match.
Unless the trim is actually white and it just looks tan in the photo.

I am not sure what I would do in the window trim corners re: 45 degree cracks.
But in the rest I would run a dull knife in the crack to get rid of the rough paint edges.
After all it looks like they are separate mouldings so if they look separate but crisp they should look OK.
 
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Old 03-16-22, 02:36 AM
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It doesn't look to me that those joints were ever caulked. You can't rely on paint to fill cracks. I'd caulk and paint over the caulk after it's set. As noted above it's best to caulk when the humidity is lower.
 
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Old 03-16-22, 06:38 AM
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Even if they were caulked, you're not going to get much caulk in a joint when it's tight, so it's prone to fail when it opens up.
 
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