What Material To Use To Trim Area In Bathroom?


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Old 09-16-22, 08:06 AM
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What Material To Use To Trim Area In Bathroom?

Hello,

I am trying to figure out what type of wood trim piece to use in my bathroom shower area.

If you look at the attached pictures, I want to trim out (cover up) this lip between where the tile ends, and where the drywall starts. Part of the problem is that the lip depth varies anywhere from 1/8" to 3/8" between the shower curb and the ceiling. Does anyone know what type of trim piece(s) to best use on this area?

Note: I don't want to use any type of tile to address this issue as wood is much easier for me to work with.

Thanks in advance!



 

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09-16-22, 08:52 AM
CarbideTipped
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I'd look at reducer transition strips, normally used for flooring. If you use a plastic one, it may be flexible enough to accommodate the taper. Wood that close to a shower is going to require frequent maintenance to keep it looking good.
 
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Old 09-16-22, 08:14 AM
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Are you able to do your own milling? Even with a router or table saw?

Because of the 1/4" difference you need to conceal the best would be to custom mill a strip and mill a taper to conceal the varying thickness. Other than that your probably left with purchasing a stock piece of trim and caulking the gaps to conceal the pie shape. You might find it easiest to just walk the millwork aisle of your local big box or building supply and see what they have that might work. You could also look at picture frame molding. Many of those profiles have an overhanging edge that could conceal the imperfection.
 
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Old 09-16-22, 08:52 AM
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I'd look at reducer transition strips, normally used for flooring. If you use a plastic one, it may be flexible enough to accommodate the taper. Wood that close to a shower is going to require frequent maintenance to keep it looking good.
 
cwbuff, Norm201 voted this post useful.
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Old 09-16-22, 09:59 AM
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Personally I think a small pencil tile would be the easiest, they have hundreds of sizes and shapes and it could just be mortared into place and grouted to fill in the different gaps. Plus it would look a little more like it belongs there!

Wood inside a shower is never a good idea, for anything!
 
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Old 09-17-22, 06:32 AM
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You need or should've used a Shlutler strip on that edge. I made the same mistake and now have a raw edge of tile. However, in my case it looks better left alone as opposed to try and re-fit an edge.
 
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Old 09-21-22, 05:37 AM
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@Pilot Dane - thanks for the suggestion about possibly using picture frame molding (never thought about that). As you said, I might just walk around HD or Lowes to see what they have that might fit and then trim as necessary.

@CarbideTipped - I like the idea about transition strips. The good news as that the area where I need this is on the fixed panel end of the shower enclosure, so there shouldn't be any moisture problems.

@Marq1 - this for this. I really want to stay away from tile as that is something that I'm terrible at. As mentioned above, this trim will be on the outside of the fixed panel of my shower enclosure.

@Norm201 - The thing I see about using Schluter on my tile is that I would still have the drywall lip exposed.
 
 

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