Lazy susan type turntable for recliner chair


  #1  
Old 09-15-23, 08:39 PM
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Question Lazy susan type turntable for recliner chair

I wonder if anyone has ever built a wooden lazy Susan that would hold a recliner chair? I have searched everywhere online hoping to buy something to allow a chair to swivel without installing a swivel conversion kit. I could not find anything except large lazy susans made for tabletop placement. This makes me wonder if it is possible to build one. Why couldn't I cut two 30" circles from plywood and place a swivel base mechanism between the circular boards? I would probably add some small blocks or glides around the base to protect the floor. I would screw the 4 chair legs to the top board to secure the chair. Does anyone think this is doable? I know there are conversion kits to add swivel bases to recliners but I thought this might be a different approach and achieve the same result. Appreciate any thoughts on this idea.
 
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Old 09-15-23, 11:15 PM
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I've never turned one over to see the detail of the underside but I would think it's possible the top of the swivel mechanism might not be flat. Additionally, the chair is going to be higher afterward and the center of gravity when both upright and reclined could be changing and would affect exactly where the swivel would sit. At a minimum, I would be trying to copy whatever is out there for purchase.
 
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Old 09-16-23, 09:56 AM
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Yes, I agree, the height of the chair would change. I think we would be ok with that. But the balance as you mentioned, is a concern. Wish I knew if anyone had ever tried something like this.
 
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Old 09-17-23, 10:47 AM
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I did something similar for a elderly tenant of mine. He was a very heavy person so stability and strength was a big concern. I did not use a "kit" or a traditional lazy susan base. Instead I used sheets of adhesive backed graphite as the bearing. It helped minimize the height gain and I could make the rings as big as possible for stability. He found a totally free swivel to make it more difficult to get in and out of the chair so the graphite worked well by providing relatively easy rotation when not in the chair but had just enough resistance that the chair didn't rotate away too easily.
 
 

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