crayon stains on rough surface (concrete)

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  #1  
Old 07-18-05, 12:13 AM
Shiki
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crayon stains on rough surface (concrete)

Hi,

We are right now in transition moving out of state, and staying at the house of our friends who're gone for a couple of months vacationing. We have a 3-yr-old who just scribbled with green crayon on "joint" part of the kitchen ceramic tile floor... Can't believe it....

Crayon is not a washable kind. By the term "joint" I meant the skinny concrete (cement?) part between ceramic tiles, with the rough surface. According to my daughter, she was moving the crayon back and forth as a choo choo train, along the joint part which was a "train track"...

My intial quick move right after it happened was to use baking soda (mixed with water) and an old toothbrush to scrub with, which seems to have worked somewhat. However, it just doesn't look like perfectly removing the color.

I didn't want ANY damage to this beautiful recently-remodeld kitchen of someone else's... What should I do now? What is a no-no? Any other type of cleaning material I could use? Any tip is welcome.

TIA,
Shiki
 
  #2  
Old 07-18-05, 02:46 AM
Shiki
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self-replying... alkaline aqueous solutions

I have been looking for tips since the first post elsewhere... while brushing the floor away...

Guess the right term was "grout"? ("joint" is the word I used originally) I'm not a native speaker, I'm sorry if my epression is too confusing.

I've come across an idea of using alkaline aqueous (water-based?) cleaning solution. (I'm guessing that any mentioning of specific brand/product names on this site is prohibited....) Is it something that would do the work for my problem? The idea I've learned so far is baking soda won't do the job for crayon which is an oil-based material... Am I right? Brushing (with or w/o baking soda) has done some job as tiny pieces of crayon chips have been coming off, but obviously there is a limit to this means.

Thanks for your attention again,
Shiki
 

Last edited by Shiki; 07-18-05 at 03:18 AM.
  #3  
Old 07-18-05, 08:48 AM
S
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Like gets out like. For oil-based stains, I use mineral spirits. However, while I cannot come up with any reason why this would damage the floor or grout, I would start with a very small area (inconspicuous is best) and quit if you notice any problems. Your post is pretty new, someone else might have a better suggestion if you wait a little longer.
 
  #4  
Old 07-18-05, 11:17 AM
Shiki
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Still afraid of staining with oil

Hi J.M.C.

Thank you for your reply.

[QUOTE=J.M.C.]Like gets out like. For oil-based stains, I use mineral spirits.

I see your point. Makes sense. Is "mineral spirits" hard to get? Where can I (drug stores probably)?

Like you said though, I will wait and see more tips before I try anything... especially because I'm afraid of staining concrete by using any oil-based solution. I read the other thread about olive oil stains on grout of kitchen floor, but I'm still not sure that's the way to go for crayon stains also. I just hope the crayon won't stain permanently by waiting for too long.

The other issue is that those tiny spots of crayon on the rough surface are "hard to reach." I have read that crayon on the smooth surface, like wooden poles, you could scrape it off as much as possible, place paper which has rough surfaces on the stains, and then apply warm iron (to melt the crayon, and print it onto the paper)... which doesn't work for the concrete grout. For my trouble, I'm thinking, "foam" instead of spray gun would work better, if there is any such kind of products out there?

Anyhow, thank you again,
Shiki
 
  #5  
Old 07-20-05, 08:03 AM
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Try using rubbing alcohol..the crayon will take a solvent based cleaner. Mineral spirits should work. But may take any sealer out of the grout. Rubbing alcohol..applied to a rag or a small amount poured on and worked in with a brush. As with anything test in a hidden area first.
 
  #6  
Old 07-20-05, 10:15 AM
Shiki
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Post Thanks!

Dear Docduck

Thank you for your reply. Rubbing alcohol... sounds familiar to me! I will give that a try.

Thanks again,
Shiki
 
  #7  
Old 07-20-05, 07:12 PM
T
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Rubbing alcohol (a solvent) is effective for removing crayon and candle wax. The Crayola Company usually recommends WD-40 (a solvent) and brush for crayon removal from concrete. Test any solvent cleaner in inconspicuous area first for ill-effects on grout. The use of the warm iron method of removing wax, although frequently recommended, can drive wax deeper into porous grout and set dye stains.
 
  #8  
Old 07-22-05, 04:44 PM
Shiki
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Thank you!

Dear Twelvepole,

I have a can of WD-40 in hand so I will try it first. I didn't think about checking what the Crayola Company says about such problems... I have no clue which company made the crayon my daughter used (the paper covering the crayon is stripped off; it can be the one that came with a kids meal at a restaurant, NOT the famous crayola, made of different material... )

I will be back sometime with result (good or bad...).

Thanks!
Shiki
 
  #9  
Old 07-27-05, 12:03 PM
brianajt
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crayon removal

I have a two year old who has drawn on just about everything... Even permant marker on my hardwood floor. The only thing that works is mr clean magic eraser I know that's a brand but it works so welll I had to say it, i( if the name is edited out, look for a white sponge in the cleaning isle with a bald man on front) . I know you were talking about using oil on the grout... I don't know if you did or not yet but that could be a bad idea because if the grout isn't sealed it will absorb the oil and appear darker than the rest...
 
 

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