Shampoo Residue

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-27-05, 04:50 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 550
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Shampoo Residue

Hello,
I have been cleaning my wall to wall rugs with hot water only and have been getting good results. I use a rotary shampooer (without the shampoo) to dispense the water and let the brushes loosen the dirt. Then I use a separate machine to extract the water. It gets out a lot of dirt that the vacumn machine missed.
Previously when I used a shampoo to clean my rugs, I was not removing enough of the cleaner and it made the rugs feel tackey to the touch when still wet.
Then the next time that the rugs needed cleaning, when using water only, I could see foam being generated by the action of the brushes. It seems to me that if shampoo residue is left in the rugs, then this would act as an attractant to dirt, especially when humidity is high. So I stopped using shampoo's years ago. What is your opinion on this?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-27-05, 08:21 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,586
Received 94 Votes on 83 Posts
Carpet cleaning generally falls into the category of not being a DIY project for the very reasons you listed. The purpose of shampoo is to attract dirt. You are then supposed to remove the shampoo with the dirt attached to it, leaving clean carpet behind. This is what professional quality carpet cleaning machines do. DIY/rental carpet cleaning machines lack sufficient power to remove all of said shampoo. With the shampoo still in your carpet, it continues to do its job of attracting dirt, making your carpet filthy.
 
  #3  
Old 09-27-05, 08:58 AM
Docduck's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Western PA
Posts: 1,453
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Floor care has become more of a science than most people realize. Soils in the carpet area acidic in nature. Thus it takes a alkaline cleaner to remove them. BUT as indicated if left in the carpet the cleaner will attract dirt. So, to counteract that there are commercial cleaners out there with a neutral pH and they use what is called encapsulation technology. Were any remaining cleaner left in the carpet. Actually hardens into a polymer that is remove by vaccuming without resoiling the carpet. There are also acidic pH rinises out there to follow "shampooing" to remove residue. But either way you need a cleaner to break the soils bonds on the carpet. Water can remove soil, but will never come close to a good cleaner.

The basics of cleaning are

C-Chemical being used
H-Heat of the chemical, applied to the carpet and rinse used to remove
A-Agiatation-of the chemical into the carpet prior to cleaning
T-Time-giving the preapplied chemical time to sit of the carpet, before rinisings to break the soils bond to the fibers.

There are also other factors to consider..Type of carpet..some carpets like olefin are oil based carpets...thus they attract oil based stains. So they need a cleaner with greater solvency.

Nylon-Responds well to cleaning..but can brown if the pH level becomes to alkaline. Neutral pH cleaners or acidic rinises are a must here.

Natural fibers-wool,cotton...can be permanently damaged by high pH levels. The brown and can shrink if left wet too long. They "like" low pH levels 3.5-5.5

Then theres factors such as if its tack stripped down or glued down.

Tack strip you can remove greater amounts of water during cleaning...BUT you have to watch those levels to avoid overwetting of pad.

Glued down-You can use more water than tack strip to flush out soilds. BUT due to there being no "open" space under the carpet. Its harder to remove greater amounts of that water. Thus wick back is a common issue to glued down carpets and olefin carpets for that matter. Dry cleaning or speed drying of these types of carpets are a must to avoid a "flim" affect over freshly cleaned carpets.

You can go on and on. But bottom line is. First figure out what type of carpet you are dealing with. Then go from there. But first you have to remove that residue. Cleaning with a acidic rinse will help. And this will not add to the effect if done correctly.
 
  #4  
Old 09-27-05, 11:23 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 550
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
J.M.C. & Docduck,
That is interesting. But I wonder if the professionals in my area are using the science as you say because I have heard negative opinions on them. There is also different ways that they use to clean rugs; There's dry chemical, Dry foam I believe in addition to water and shampoo. As far as I know , there is no concenus on which is better. I believe the owners of these business's are trained well but their employees are not.

I have been a do it yourselfer for most of 40 years and you have a point on using professional equipment. I will see about replacing my shampooer/extractor machine if I can find something with stronger suction. A wet/dry shop comes to mind. The machine I use, draws 5.7 amps and is called "Hydroclean" manufactered by Douglas. However, I am pleased with the rotary shampooer and will continoue to use it. Its a Kenmore.

So after 40 years, I have seen my share of disappointments over manufacture or dealer claims on the performance of their equipment or services. This has a lot of weight when and if I consider hiring a professional. I know I spend more time in doing it myself but the results are very satisfactory.
 
  #5  
Old 09-27-05, 02:44 PM
Docduck's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Western PA
Posts: 1,453
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Some professional cleaning companies like any other professional...have good trained staff OR poorly trained staff. Doing comparison shopping and referalls are a must. Dry cleaning has come on strong as of late. But also has its pros and cons. Dry cleaning will remove the top layer of soil in a carpet only. Leaving the deep down soil. Plus dry cleaning will not flush out spills and other containinates. Only extraction can do that. Equipement used for water extraction should be based off of water lift measurements more than amp draw. A machine can draw alot of amps but still lack the vaccum ability. Then you get into factors even with that such as length of the hose and attachments effecting the water lift, water flow to begin with and again back to the type of carpet itself.
 
  #6  
Old 09-27-05, 05:16 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 550
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
<Equipement used for water extraction should be based off of water lift measurements more than amp draw>
Docduck,
Very good point. When I need to clean my rugs again, I'll be checking out the lift capability of professional equipment at the local tool rental companys.
 
  #7  
Old 09-28-05, 01:11 AM
Docduck's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Western PA
Posts: 1,453
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Just a example the water lift rating of a commercial vaccum i was looking at was 106 inches. One of my commercial extractors has a rating of 132 inches. Even thou a vaccum isnt made for removing water...it is rated as water lift. So, if you see water lift that is what that means. Good luck with your search.
 
  #8  
Old 09-29-05, 04:36 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,818
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Carpet manufacturers recommend professional carpet cleaning every 12-18 months before carpet becomes soiled. A Carpet Rug Institute (CRI)certified professional is recommended. For information on selecting a CRI professional, go to http://www.carpet-rug.org/drill_down...?page=14&sub=4

Professionals have trucks with long hoses that have enough suction to remove excess moisture that saturates carpet & cushion and can cause mold & mildew problems. They use cleaners that do not leave residues that attract soil. They also can maintain hot enough water temperature to disinfect, remove soil, and return memory to yarn twist.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: