Removing cigarette smoke odor

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Old 02-25-07, 06:31 PM
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Removing cigarette smoke odor

Anybody know of a good way to remove cigarette smoke odor from furniture? My wife just inherited a couch and chair from her recently departed uncle and they reek of cigarette smoke. The furniture is Lazyboy furniture and worth some attempts at salvaging.

Thanks...Randy
 

Last edited by Annette; 02-26-07 at 11:47 AM.
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Old 02-26-07, 05:55 AM
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I'm assuming they are not leather?
If they are fabric covered, and have years of daily smoke soaked into them, it is possible that they will need new foam

The best thing I can suggest is let them air out as much as possible, then steam clean them several times with an upholstery attachment and steam cleaner
Don't use solvents or "Febreze" at this point

If this seems like it might be working, then after it dries completely, use an vacuum-off upholstery shampoo then/or a vacuum-off baking soda "carpet-freshener"

If at this point, they still stinks, the smell is well into the foam, which acts like a giant odor filter....the part of the filter you throw away and replace with a new filter when it's "full"
The foam shouldn't be too difficult to replace as far as upholstering goes, but it's unlikely you'll find what you need pre-cut and ready to go
You will have to do some searching for foam and cutting and shaping etc.
 
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Old 02-26-07, 07:24 PM
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Hmm, you may be right about the foam theory. That makes a lot of sense. You were correct in your assumption about the fabric. They are fabric.

My wife has already had a professional (Coit) steamcleaner in and they cleaned them. It seemed better until they began drying. Everyone in the house swore that the smell got worse.

Thanks for the response.
 
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Old 02-26-07, 10:04 PM
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This is a restoration type cleaning. Any attempts at just a single one time cleaning is not going to fix the issue. Think of it this way...the smell didnt get into the furniture in one day, so cleaning it one time isnt going to do the trick. Adding moisture to the cushions, may of simply amplified the already exisiting odor. At this point, if they have been cleaned and it has not produced great results. You may want to have foam replaced. You may find out that it may be next to impossible to remove all of the odor, if your household doesnt smoke you may always notice a odor. I have had this problem in the past with a few jobs and to be honest it took more work and labor than what the piece was worth. So, you have to think about your comfort level of odor. If you are comfortable with some odor than keep trying to clean. If your not i would just bit the bullet so to speak.
 
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Old 02-27-07, 03:36 AM
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Thanks Docduck. I hear what you're saying. After looking at the structure again I believe it would cost more to replace the foam than it would to replace the whole piece, as the cushions are not zippered, like some were of days passed.

So, I guess I'll put a bit more effort into it and see where it leads, but I'm not real optimistic about it anymore.
 
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Old 02-27-07, 08:08 AM
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They do make products out there designed just to remove this type of odor. Some professional restorers of fire damage use the same process with a fogging machine or ozone machine. But this again ranks up there with the problem of cost of repair vs replacement
 
 

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