Spilled Fuel Oil


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Old 01-09-08, 07:39 PM
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Post Spilled Fuel Oil

I need to know how to clean up spilled fuel oil from my heating tank. When the oil company filled the tank, the hose came off and sprayed fuel all over the basement....on the carpet, on the concrete, under the furnace, on the walls. I need to know how to get rid of the smell that is all through the house, as well as how to clean up. We had to rip up the carpet, tear out the walls, and have been scrubbing the floors & the smells are still there. Any suggestions?
 
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Old 01-10-08, 11:32 AM
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File an insurance claim with the fuel oil company and let the cleaning pros take care of it. Really.
 
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Old 01-10-08, 12:08 PM
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The oil company claims that it is not their fault, because the basement was just remodeled, and the person who did the remodeling said that it is not their fault, so it is left up to us to deal with.
 
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Old 01-10-08, 04:57 PM
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What does the remodeled room have to do with the oil companies mishap?

It is their fault for not properly relieving pressure from the hose.

I would talk with management, if the manager said it's not their fault, talk with his boss, then his boss, etc. If all that fails, talk with a lawyer.
 
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Old 01-10-08, 06:39 PM
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For the moment, air flow is what you need - smells are particulate and the faster you can get them out of the area, the faster the smell goes away.
 
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Old 01-11-08, 04:45 AM
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I have been opening my windows through the day and it seems to be better, but then when I have to close them back up, it is just as strong. Lawyer issues and everything else aside, I still would like to do what i can for now to make it more livable.

I have scrubbed the floor with dawn; I've used baking soda and kitty litter....anything else anyone can think of? I noticed on alot of topics, Orange concentrate is used, would that be a possiblity?

Thanks for your input.
 
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Old 01-13-08, 11:19 AM
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To remove any oil from a concrete floor, cover it with dry Portland cement powder (available at any lumber yard or big box store). This is not premixed masonry cement or concrete, but just the pure cement. Cover it to about 1/2" depth and leave it sit as long as necessary. It could take a month or longer, but it will wick it up. Cement is very hygroscopic, meaning it absorbs liquids. This also works on old oil stains such as from a car crankcase leaking, it just takes longer. The longer the stain has been there, the longer it takes to absorb it. The good thing is that it's not labor intensive. For the immediate future the citrus based cleaner may make it more pleasant, but I don't know that for sure. Good luck.
 
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Old 01-13-08, 12:12 PM
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Your home has suffered major damage from this oil spill.
The first thing I would do is see a lawyer and maybe he/she can get the oil company to go good on the damages without taking it to court.

A letter from a lawyer may convince the oil company to get their insurance company involved.
 
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Old 01-15-08, 12:06 PM
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Wink

Here's the deal. Actually, this question was asked on behalf of my sister. It was her basement that was damaged. She said that when they remodeled the basement, they had to put an extension on the piping. They have had at least 3 oil fills since the remodeling, but this time it just happened to work loose. That is why the oil co. says that it is not their fault.

I passed the recommendations on to her about the Portland Cement. Thanks for your input!! I will keep you posted!
 
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Old 01-15-08, 02:20 PM
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So, we didn't get the whole story then.
Thanks for coming clean.
 
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Old 01-15-08, 04:30 PM
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If you are opening windows for ventilation, add some fans to the mix. You can lower windows at night when temperature drops, but leave the windows open a fraction and leave the fans runnning. Use the absorptive material to soak up the spill. Once the oil has been absorbed from the concrete, then you can scrub with orange oil concentrate (not the orange what-ever products), which is used industrially to degrease concrete. Concrete is porous and absorbent, and the odor will linger until the oil has been absorbed from the concrete and then the surfaces cleaned. Contact your homeowner's insurance agent. Let him/her take the lead in seeking restitution for the damages.
 
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Old 01-16-08, 07:19 AM
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Red face

Thanks for your help! Sorry if I didn't tell it straight from the start. This is my first question that I ever posted & I didn't know if I was allowed to ask for someone else. I hope I didn't upset anyone. I am really impressed by the input from everyone. Thanks so much!!
 
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Old 01-16-08, 02:45 PM
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No one is upset at all.
We just want to give you the best solution possible.

Hope these suggestions work for her.
 
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Old 01-16-08, 03:35 PM
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Smile

No apologies necessary. It's often difficult to interpret posts and they often get interpreted differently by different readers. With all of us working together asking questions to acquire more info and further discussion, we usually come up with a clarification and helpful information.

BTW, welcome to the forums! We look forward to future posts by you and more helpful discussions.
 
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Old 01-22-08, 09:00 AM
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Here's more information from the Portland Cement Association (PCA). They say that after initial cleanup with paper towels or cloth, to cover with a dry, powdered absorbent material, such as hydrated lime, fuller's earth, calcium carbonate, portland cement, or fly ash. Sweep up after a day and recover. Continue this treatment until no more oil is absorbed by the powder. This method will probably get rid of the smell the fastest because you're disposing of it as you go. Then clean with the concentrated orange oil. They suggest stronger hydrocarbons & glycol ethers, but I think those would be dangerous in a house, and the orange oils would be much more pleasant. I hope this helps.
 
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Old 07-29-14, 04:28 PM
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Old thread... Closed... Please start new...

Thanks....
 
 

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